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READ LOADS MORE ALBUM REVIEWS OVER ON OUR WEBSITE > OUTLINEONLINE.CO.UK


THE SONIC DAWN ECLIPSE


Pavlis 6/10


I picked up on Denmark’s Sonic Dawn when I saw the word “psychedelic” in the PR blurb. Yes, this is psychedelic, there is no doubt about that. It is just that I was expecting something more, I dunno, modern psyche like Acid Mothers Temple whilst this rooted in the late 60s.


In a way, the band’s devotion to recreating the sounds of psychedelia’s (first) heyday is admirable. There is lots to enjoy here. The guitars - fuzztone rhythm, classy lead, finger- picked acoustic - are all tasteful. The harmony vocals verge on the lovely, bringing to mind Fleet Foxes. Lyrics are peppered with references to psychedelic rangers, it being forever 1969, cosmic minds and the circle of life. The songs are well structured and pleasant, in a bucolic, verging on cosmic Americana, kinda way.


I enjoyed this LP but the band just never really let rip and jam out and some of the songs are crying out for that. This is decent enough and I’ll play it again but I bet that it is live that this lot really fly. Now, if someone can get them to NAC or the Waterfront Studio, I’ll see ya down the front...


BAYONNE DRASTIC MEASURES


David Auckland 8/10


Drastic Measures is Austin-based Roger Sellers' second full-length album to be released under the Bayonne moniker. Inspired by the symphonic pop arrangements of Mancini, Bacharach and Martin; and undeniably influenced by the electro-synth bands of the early 1980's, Drastic Measures emerges from the new wave of composer-musician-producers, and is engineered with the draughtsman-like precision of a beautiful timepiece. It emerges as a meticulous collation of melody and minimalism, traversing the fine line between experience and exploration, and straddling the striding edge that separates confidence and self- doubt to produce a multi-layered pendulum of highs and lows.


From the ambient opening of Q.A. to the reflective conclusion of Bothering, the emphasis is on striving to square the circle of life as a creative musician. As well as tapping into an obvious love of composers like Reich, Reilly, and even Tangerine Dream, Sellers reaches into a rich and highly personalised collection of field recordings, which are skilfully looped into a multifarious menagerie of rich tone and sonic sampling. His vocal style is similar to that of C Duncan and, like Duncan, assumes a delicate, folk-tinged dreaminess. Along the way also expect to pick up on elements of Tears for Fears and Red Box, Keane and Coldplay, and even Phil Collins. It all makes Drastic Measures a rich and rewarding tapestry to unpick.


SAMIA MALIK AZAADI FREEDOM


Amrit Wilson 8/10


I first heard Samia Malik's (Norwich based artist) music back in 1998 when her debut albumThe Colour of the Hearthad just been released. The haunting melody of her voice with its deep sense of longing, the originality and sensitivity of her lyrics. Here, at last, was a British Asian musician who was able, not only to write songs and sing in Urdu and English, but to combine a powerful performance in English with an uncompromisingly South Asian sensibility


In 2017, nearly twenty years later I got to see Samia perform again at the launch of her brilliant third albumAzaadi: Freedom. Her voice still haunting and melodious now has a new strength and conviction, its music qualities honed and perfected by intense training in Indian classical music and complimented now by a wonderful group of musicians including the so-called 'sitarist to the stars' Baluji Shrivastav. Her presence on stage together with projections of her own visual art is tremendously powerful and inspiring. (Azaadi, as she tells us, reflects her own personal journey through art 'which was an instrument of... healing and empowerment'). At a time when women the world over are facing an onslaught of intensified patriarchal violence and oppression, these iconic songs are needed to heal and empower us too.


OUTLINEONLINE.CO.UK / FEB-MAR 2019 / 21


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