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against mental decline and even correct stroke damage. In a Swiss study using MRI, people drinking green tea immediately had heightened activity in the work- ing-memory part of their brain.


Supplement with this: Ruhoy rec- ommends boswellia, long used in Asian and African medicine. It targets cerebral inflammation, stimulates the growth of neurons, enhances cognition, lowers depression and alleviates learning and memory problems.


Try this movement: Shake it. Alternating slow movements, or even rest with one-to-two-minute bursts of intense, all-out, heart-pounding moves like Zumba dancing, jog- ging or lunges increases important proteins called the neurotrophic factor that help brain cells grow, work and live longer, reports a new study from Canada’s McMaster University.


Rejuvenate the Heart Stress also increases hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol, which drive up blood pressure, blood sugar and inflamma- tion, says holistic cardiologist Joel Kahn, M.D., of Detroit, author of Te Whole Heart Solution: Halt Heart Disease Now


with the Best Alternative and Traditional Medicine.


Assess it: Shortness of breath, irregu- lar heartbeat, anxiety, panic and swollen feet or ankles are signs the heart may be overloaded. Get medical help immediately if there is unusual deep exhaustion, unex- plained weakness, nausea, dizziness, chest pain or pain that spreads to the arms.


Eat this: “Te best foods for a stressed heart are those rich in magnesium. I like a giant green, leafy salad, oſten organic arugula, with blueberries, pumpkin seeds and walnuts,” says Kahn.


Drink this: hot, golden turmeric milk, made with organic soy or nut milks, a heaping tablespoon of tur- meric (a potent anti-inflammatory also shown to reverse Alzheimer’s “brain tangles”), a pinch of black pepper and maybe an organic pump-


kin spice mix.


Supplement with this:Hawthorn strengthens and tones heart muscles, sup- presses deadly blood-clotting signals, fights inflammation and lowers heart attack risk, studies show. European doctors routinely prescribe it for managing mild heart failure, either alone or with drugs.


Try this movement: Hop on a bike: Cycling 20 miles a week slashes heart disease risk by half, reports the British Medical Journal. Also, do slow stretches every day: A Japanese study found a correlation between flexibility of the body and of the arteries.


Cleanse the Lungs


Family holidays may not always be uncon- ditionally loving, which can induce stress, anger and sadness—emotions linked in laboratory studies to decreases in lung function. “You can actually give yourself a stress asthma attack,” says Maui naturopath Carolyn Dean, M.D., ND, author of Te Complete Natural Medicine Guide to Women’s Health.


Assess it: Trouble breathing, shortness of breath and a cough that won’t go away are signs of stressed-out lungs. If there’s coughing up of blood or mucus, or discomfort or pain when breathing, see a doctor.


Eat this: A 10-year study of 650 Euro- pean adults found that eating apples and


An Ounce of Prevention B


y taking a few forward-thinking steps, we can protect ourselves pro- actively from dangers to our vital organs:


Brain Just say Om! Meditation enlarges parts of the brain concerned with memory, body awareness and emotional control, concluded a review of 21 neuroimaging studies from 300 meditators. Insight- Timer.com, a meditation app, makes it easy to meditate for even five minutes a day.


Heart Every night, write down two or three things to be grateful for. Heart patients at the University of California, San Diego,


that did this for two months had reduced heart inflammation and improved cardiac biomarkers. “Appreciating even the littlest things builds a heart-protective habit of gratitude,” says study author Paul J. Mills, Ph.D., a professor of family medicine and public health.


Lungs Many popular cleaning products contain dangerous chemicals, including volatile organic compounds (VOC) that sev- eral studies link to breathing problems, asthma and allergies. Check out the Environmental Working Group’s toxicity information on 2,500 products at ewg.org/guides/cleaners.


Kidneys To energize sluggish kidneys, try a quar- ter teaspoon of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) in water. In a British study of 134 people with advanced chronic kidney disease, this easy strategy reduced the rate of kidney decline to normal levels. Check with a doctor if under nephrology care.


Liver Examine the ingredients in prescriptions and over-the-counter meds to make sure daily intake of acetaminophen doesn’t exceed 3,000 milligrams; accidental over- use is the biggest cause of liver failure in the U.S.


January 2019 27


Maria Averburg/Shutterstock.com


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