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By Judy Wardrope Past Successes at WEG Dressage • Driving • Eventing • Jumping


With the 2018 World Equestrian Games in North Carolina on the immediate horizon, it would be interesting to take a look back at horses who have been successful at previous WEG competitions. Let’s flashback to some medal-winners from the Games of 2006, 2010 and 2014.


Horse 1 He took the silver medal in dressage at the 2014 Games in Normandy. As has been described in this column on previous occasions, he is built to do upper- level dressage. His LS gap (just in front of the high point of the croup) is bisected by a line drawn from the top of one hip to the top of the other hip, which gives him a strong transmission for the power he generates. His rear triangle is shortest on the ilium side, which is definitely a dressage trait, and his stifle protrusion is just below the bottom of his sheath, another dressage trait. The pillar of support (a


line extended upwards and downwards using the naturally occurring groove in the forearm) emerges well in front of the withers, adding some lightness to the forehand. It also emerges into the rear quarter of his hoof for soundness and longevity. His humerus is of moderate-


Horse 2 He earned gold in dressage at the 2006 Games in Aachen. He is essentially built the same as Horse 1 when comparing the majority of the objective descriptors; however, he varies slightly in that he is even on the femur side (point of buttock to stifle protrusion) and the side from point of hip to stifle protrusion. Horse 1 is slightly longer from point of hip to stifle protrusion, which usually manifests as more range of motion and aids in extension. However, neither horse was lacking in extension. The other area of difference


1 2 3


to-short length and shows a substantial rise from elbow to point of shoulder, resulting in a higher point of shoulder, which adds more lightness to the forehand. It also adds more knee action.


A base of neck that is well above his high point of shoulder is the final factor in lightness of the forehand.


36 September/October 2018


is that Horse 2 is longer in the neck than Horse 1. In fact, he is longer in the neck than most top dressage mounts. To hold the upper-level frame, he compensated by developing muscles and muscle endurance in front of his scapula and above where the neck bones join the torso. In order to release these muscles, he would want to reach forward with the neck and over-flex at the poll. This would be similar to you releasing the tension in the back of your neck by tucking your chin and stretching it towards your chest. (Note: Not all horses develop these muscles; therefore, not all horses respond well to the same stretch.)


Horse 3 He was a dressage specialist


on the gold-medal four-in-hand driving team at the 2014 Games in Normandy. He is built quite similarly to the two dressage horses, Horse 1 and Horse 2. He differs slightly in the rear triangle. His ilium side is only slightly shorter than his femur side, and his femur side (point of buttock to stifle protrusion) is equal to the side from stifle protrusion to point of hip, meaning


Conformation


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