search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
green living


C


reeks, streams and rivers flow into ponds, lakes and oceans, carrying pollution. Keeping large bodies of


water clean starts with local waterways. As awareness of this need rises, some


rivers in Africa, India, New Zealand and elsewhere are being protected and recog- nized as living entities, with rights, values and the legal status of people. While court cases brought by commercial interests are challenging such decisions, progress continues on many fronts.


Cleanup Success Stories


We Need Clean Waters Streams and Rivers Are Life Links


by Avery Mack


Improve your Fitness and Health Today!


Judy Liu is a Registered Yoga Teacher with the Yoga Alliance, a RRCA


Certifi ed Running Coach, an American Council on Exercise (ACE) Certifi ed Fitness Instructor and Integrated Health Coach. She offers several group and private sessions at different studios in Cary.


For more information, please visit www.strenuacoach.com or like the Facebook page Strenua LLC.


34 NA Triangle www.natriangle.com


“Te Fox River’s been our treasure since Native Americans paddled there,” says Barbara Smits, part-owner of Old North- west Frontier Tours, provider of self-guid- ed auto, bicycle and walking tours via eB- ook, in De Pere, Wisconsin. “To see people sail, boat, ice fish or sightsee here again is a joy.” Te Fox River Cleanup Project, a multi-year effort covering 13 miles that began in 2009, reduces the health and environmental risks from polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in the sediment. Lake Winnebago, source of the lower


Fox River, is currently stewarded under the 2000 Lake Sturgeon Management Plan. Recent meetings have sought citizen input for updates in managing sturgeon stock. In Athens County, Ohio, Michelle


Shively, in Trimble, is Sunday Creek’s watershed coordinator. “Every minute, 850 to 1,000 gallons of polluted water from an underground mine pool flows into the creek, turning the water orange from iron waste. Once the iron is removed, you need to do something with it,” she says. Guy Riefler, Ph.D., an associate profes-


sor of civil engineering, and John Sabraw, professor of art and chair of a painting and drawing program, both with Ohio University, in Athens, found a way to wash, dry and pulverize recovered iron. It will be sold to Gamblin Artists Colors to make oil paints for artists in mustardy ochre, rusty red and violet tones. Not yet widely avail- able, 500 sample tubes of Reclaimed Earth Violet were featured at an initial fundraiser.


“Cleaning water is expensive, but now we’ve turned the problem into a method to fund more work,” says Shively. Troughout history, river dams have


Filip Fuxa/Shutterstock.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40