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Member Section ...any other business A roundup of news from Chamber members


...any other business is designed to help satisfy the huge demand the Chamber gets from members seeking to publicise their activities. We have now moved company appointments to our daily bulletin, ChamberlinkDaily, which goes out every morning to nearly 17,000 business and individuals across the West Midlands.


Selfridges leads the fight against plastic


Selfridges wants the whole of the UK to follow its lead by banning single-use plastic carbonated drinks. It follows the success of the 2015 Selfridges Project Ocean campaign, which saw all single-use plastic water bottles removed from its stores in Birmingham and the rest of the country. Selfridges and its partners now


want to inspire change across the wider sector by encouraging companies to remove all single-use plastic carbonated drinks from their offices and retail outlets in order to encourage the end of throwaway plastic.


Alannah Weston, deputy chairman of Selfridges Group, said: “Our customers expect us to be responsible and our values underpin this requirement. “We are seeing a huge shift in


people’s attitudes to single-use plastic water bottles, and now, carbonated drinks. “As a city, we still have a long


way to go but we can encourage environmentally conscious behaviour from individuals, to manufacturers, and retailers. “At Selfridges we want to


continue to support that change and give our customers the choice to buy better.” Driven by the unthinkable


prediction that by 2025 our seas could contain one kilogram of plastic waste for every three kilograms of fish, Project Ocean 2018 will focus on building momentum behind the #OneLess project, an initiative born out of Project Ocean and run by international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) and the Marine CoLABoration. By removing single-use


carbonated drinks from its foodhalls and concessions, Selfridges is calling on everyone in the UK to switch to plastic-free alternatives such as aluminium cans and glass.


70 CHAMBERLINK May 2018


Holy traffic safety, it’s Batman on crossing patrol


Long-lost footage of Adam West’s Batman teaching road safety to children will be screened for the first time in over 50 years to kick off a nationwide hunt for 100 missing telly gems. The clip from May 1967 was


shown to an audience of TV professionals and enthusiasts at Birmingham City University as Birmingham-based Kaleidoscope launched its list of the UK’s top 100 missing TV shows.


‘These lost episodes really can end up in the most unusual of places’


Kaleidoscope, which specialises


in finding missing television footage, recently discovered the clip which shows the Caped Crusader teaching the Green Cross Code on London’s streets and was never screened outside of the UK. The find comes as Kaleidoscope launches a search for the top TV shows thought to have thought to have been consigned to history, which industry professionals most want to see recovered.


Bat advice: Adam West teaches these London youngsters how to cross the road Bosses have called on home


Episodes of iconic British TV


programmes Doctor Who, Top of the Pops and The Avengers topped the list, after 1,000 industry professionals, journalists, academics and telly addicts revealed which shows they most wanted to see found. The list was unveiled at Birmingham City University’s Parkside Building alongside screenings of found clips from show such as Out of the Unknown, Sexton Blake and The Goodies.


viewers to come forwards with any recordings and video tapes which could contain precious ‘lost’ material. Kaleidoscope CEO Chris Perry


said: “We spend a lot of time searching through old canisters or looking through lofts to try and find these shows which are thought to have been erased from history. “These lost episodes really can


end up in the most unusual of places and people might not even know they have them.”


Social warming campaign kicks off


A crowdfunding campaign has raised £20,000 in a bid to get people in the city to get to know each other better. The campaign launches on the 12 May, where the


public will be encouraged to ‘melt the ice’ and ‘greet someone with a smile’. The launch event will take place in Birmingham City Centre, where a two metre by two metre ice block with the message “Help melt the ice – #permissiontosmile – greet someone today” will be frozen inside. As well as the social buzz created on the day, an


app will be made available that will connect local new and existing local voluntary groups. The aim of the


campaign is to combat loneliness and isolation, which according to the campaign’s founder – Martin Graham – attributes to people not reaching out to others in their local community. Martin said: “We absolutely need to break out of


this cycle of separateness, loosen up, turn up the dial on simple friendliness and see where it leads. “I’m convinced that, with enough support, it will


lead to a lot of new friendships, initiatives and a shift in the atmosphere that I like to call ‘social warming’. “We want to fill Birmingham with our banners, car


stickers, social networking and the initiatives the campaign inspires.”


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