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Chamber Patrons Chamber Patrons Greater Birmingham Chambers’ leading supporters


Midland Heart have appointed Glenn Harris as their new chief executive officer. Glenn was formerly executive


Urgent problems: Prof Martin Freer


Energy Innovation Zones on the horizon


A new report making the case for the creation of Energy Innovation Zones (EIZs) in the West Midlands has been unveiled. The report is produced by the


University of Birmingham, together with Energy Capital and the Energy Systems Catapult. A commission chaired by Sir


David King, the Government’s former permanent special representative for climate change, is calling for four pilot energy hubs to be located in central Birmingham and Tyseley, UK Central in Solihull, the Black Country and Coventry South. The report states the main focus


of the EIZs will be to integrate low carbon technologies, to develop the business models and infrastructure needed to support new approaches to clean energy. The EIZs aim to demonstrate new technologies, and to turn them into fully commercial propositions. They will also offer a controlled environment in which innovators can trial new services and generate faster progress in the areas of energy that urgently need attention, such as transport and heat. Professor Martin Freer, from the


University of Birmingham, director of the Birmingham Energy Institute, and lead author on the report, said: “Many of the urgent problems require the integration of energy systems such as heat and electricity grids or the integration of energy into wider systems such as waste and transport, which must happen locally. So local leadership is vital to the success of clean energy investments, and a local approach could produce collaborations across the energy sector and new technologies faster, with less risk.”


26 CHAMBERLINK May 2018


director for corporate resources for homes and landlords. It follows Ruth Cooke’s announcement that she was leaving to join Clarion. Group chairman at Midland Heart


John Edwards said: “Following a very robust recruitment process the board and I are thrilled to be able to announce Glenn’s appointment as Midland Heart’s new CEO. “Having been with the Midland


Heart for over six years, Glenn is a well-established member of the executive team and he brings continuity alongside a strong vision for the future of our organisation. “I very much look forward to


working with him as we plan for the next stage of our corporate strategy.” Glenn joined Midland Heart


following a career spanning seven years at East Midlands Development Agency (EMDA), where he spent five years as


‘Midland Heart is in a strong position to deliver even more affordable homes and provide better customer service’


New CEO: Glenn Harris


executive director of corporate services, followed by two years as deputy chief executive. Before that, he was deputy chief


executive at NHS Logistics, supplying over £1bn of consumable goods to all NHS Trusts across England. Glenn, who received an MBE for


services to business in 2012, said: “I am looking forward to working with colleagues from across Midland Heart to both deliver the


final year of our existing Fit for the Future strategy and set ambitious future plans for the organisation. “Midland Heart is in a strong


position to deliver even more affordable homes and provide better customer service, excelling in these areas will be my focus as we move forward. “I want to take this opportunity


to thank Ruth for her leadership and wish her well in her new role.”


Wesleyan backs Women in Finance


Wesleyan, the specialist financial services mutual, has signed the Women in Finance Charter – with a promise to reach 33 per cent female representation within its senior management by 2023. The mutual will achieve its targets through a


mixture of planned initiatives focusing on the attraction, development and promotional opportunities of women, as well as retention of those already in post. The Women in Finance Charter is a commitment by HM Treasury and signatory firms to work together to build a more balanced and fair financial services sector. Wesleyan’s chief risk officer Roger Dix, who is


heading up the mutual’s inclusion and diversity initiative, said: “Our customers come from a wide range of backgrounds and we want to reflect this diversity within our own people, helping us to do what’s right both for the business as well as the doctors, dentists, lawyers and teachers we serve. “Research shows we make better decisions when a


diverse group of people is involved. We want to foster a positive working environment in which people feel included, and our diversity celebrated. “Being an inclusive and diverse organisation is


extremely important to us and that’s why we’re delighted to sign the Charter.”


Focus on women (L-R): Roger Dix (inclusion and diversity lead and chief risk officer), Caroline Hill (director of HR and corporate services) and Steve Fourie (gender employee network sponsor and chief information officer)


The Charter reflects the Government’s aspiration to


see gender balance at all levels across financial services, creating an inclusive workforce that is good for business and good for customers. Wesleyan has taken various steps to become even


more inclusive through a number of employee network groups, staff training and more focused support for female customers.


Contact: Henrietta Brealey T: 0121 607 1898


Glenn takes new chief executive role to heart


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