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TEMPLEMAN LIBRARY, CANTERBURY


Wide strands of bronze anodised mesh run down the building’s facade between the concrete fins. Winstanley explains the speci- fication choice here: “We wanted something that would work as an alternative to the timber [of the original building window frames], that would still feel right.” The warm tones of the bronze also counterpoint the more austere brick and concrete, balancing the aesthetic and giving it a contemporary edge. The particular shade of bronze used, which Winstanley says “worked well with the original building palette” matched the American walnut used for windows and interior furnishings. In addition to the extension, the renova- tion of the original building saw new curtain walling replace the glazing set between the brick piers. This serves to “weave the language of the new library extension into the existing building to create a cohesive whole,” says the project leader, as well as reducing the number of horizontal contours imposed by the former abundance of windowsills that could hinder the overall aesthetic.


Interiors


Given the extended periods that students were spending in the library, it had to be a comfortable space to study in. Double- height spaces are continued from Holford’s original 1960s design in the extension, giving ample natural light and space for students studying.


The deep-plan character of much of the building meant that natural ventilation, on its own, wasn’t feasible. The solution was a mixed mode ventilation system achieved through the use of manually openable sash windows, which not only help students engage with control of their environmental comfort, they also provide better airflow than tilt-turn windows. Out-of-reach windows are mechanically assisted by actua- tors which open the windows automatically


when CO2 levels get too high, and there is additional mechanical ventilation. When it comes to library acoustics,


Winstanley advocates a mix: “You want some areas to be really noisy, some areas to be kind of social, and some areas to be really, really quiet.” She adds that robust envelope design is key: “As a result of the envelope being acoustically good, you don't get lots of noise from outside, and you don't get lots of noise leaking from one floor to the other.” Acoustic soffit boards on the ceilings are shaped to reiter- ate the pattern introduced by the diagonal in situ concrete coffered soffit located at


ADF FEBRUARY 2018 WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


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