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L I V E 2 4 -SE V EN


war. Since the fall of communism, and the exposure from Schindler’s List, it has rebounded into a vibrant, bohemian neighbourhood of cafes, bars, antique shops and galleries.


Kazimierz is an atmospheric area to wander the winding streets with glimpses of old synagogues, historic buildings and Jewish cemeteries. The Joneses enjoyed spotting some fantastic street art, including a mural of Gene Kelly singing in the rain. More sobering, they caught sight of an abandoned building with a hand-written plaque in memory of a Jewish family who had been moved out in 1941.


While in Krakow, the Joneses saw lots of posters advertising guided trips to Auschwitz – the largest concentration camp run by the Nazis. They had both already visited, several years ago, hence decided not to return on this occasion. If you want to visit Auschwitz, you need to pre-book and allow a whole day, as it is 75km from the city. The Joneses found it an intensely memorable and sobering experience, but felt it was an incredibly important place to visit.


Eating & Drinking Mrs & Mr Jones wanted to try some local specialties, which you can find at various local restaurants or Milk Bars. They tried typically Polish pierogi dumplings. Mrs Jones’ favourite were the steamed ‘ruskie’ (Russian) ones – filled with potato and cottage cheese, topped with caramelized onions. Mr Jones loved the ‘golonka’ – slow cooked pork knuckle, served with roast potatoes.


TRAVEL INFORMATION: Bonerowski Palace – palacbonerowski.com


Sheraton Grand – sheratongrandkrakow.com Restaurant Pod Nosem – podnosem.com Restaurant Szara – szara.pl/menu_en.html Wodka Bar – wodkabar.pl


For a more upscale, traditional experience, Noworolski is a classic café in the Cloth Hall. Once a hangout of Lenin, it is now frequented by well-heeled locals enjoying the elegant art nouveau surroundings.


Near Wawel Castle, the Jones ate at Pod Nosem, feasting on goose leg braised in dark beer with dumplings and dried fruits. But Restaurant Szara, on the market square, was their favourite. It features in the Michelin guide and the food was really delicious in a traditional setting. Restaurant Bonerowska steak and fish restaurant, also on the market square, is another lovely option.


You can’t visit Poland without trying their most famous drink – vodka. One of the highlights of the Joneses stay was a fun couple of hours in Wodka. Inside this tiny bar, guests choose from an incredible range of flavoured vodkas. Mr Jones chose them a couple of tasting boards of six - a perfect diversion on a dark, snowy afternoon.


Staying Mrs & Mr Jones stayed at the historic, boutique-style Bonerowski Palace on the market square in the Old Town. Their room was up a flight of spiral stairs lit by beautiful chandeliers. It was a good size, but had a warm and cosy feel with everything they needed for a city break weekend – comfy bed, good shower and kettle. Breakfast was an impressive spread of fruits, pastries, cheeses and meats. The Restaurant Bonerowska is a very good steak and fish restaurant.


Alternatively, the recently refurbished Sheraton Grand Krakow is located on the Vistula River. Club Rooms have views over the river and towards Wawel Castle. They also allow access to the Club Lounge with complimentary drinks and snacks. The Olive Restaurant offers year round dining in the atrium, while the roof top terrace offers beautiful views in summer. There is a spa including a small pool.


Written by Sara Chardin. To read more ideas of city breaks, visit allaboardtheskylark.com


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