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L I V E 2 4 -SE V EN


MR S & MR JONE S KRAKOW IN POL AND


Our very own couple, Mrs and Mr Jones, hosts our travel section. They thoroughly investigate destinations ideal for a little trip away revealing vital tips on a glamorous getaway and also provide the inside track to ensure the destination caters for a range of tastes and wallets. From the slickest city hangouts to peaceful boltholes, you won’t waste a moment planning your travels.


This month they visit Krakow in Poland


For a winter break, Mrs & Mr Jones headed off for a weekend in Krakow, Poland. It’s only 2 hours 20 minutes flying time from London making it a comfortable, short hop. Whilst this city can be quite chilly in winter, there are plenty of cafés and bars to warm up in.


Getting there EasyJet operates direct flights from Gatwick on various days of the week. British Airways operates direct flights from Heathrow. A 30- minute taxi journey from the airport to the Old Town will cost around £20. The return journey will cost around £10. The bus or train is a cheaper option. Once there, it’s easy to get around on foot or hop on a tram.


Krakow Krakow (pronounced Krak-of ) is Poland’s second largest city and located in the south of the country. It is often described as the cultural capital of Poland and is positioned on the banks of the Vistula River.


The Old Town is ringed by Planty Park, which is a lovely route to walk (even if covered in


snow). The huge market square (Rynek Glowny) is at the heart of the Old Town, home to the impressive St Mary’s Basilica.


Krakow fortunately escaped the worst of the WWII bombing and is still full of beautiful, medieval buildings. However, whilst the buildings escaped at the hands of the Nazis, the people did not. Jewish residents were deported, sent to the ghetto or to nearby Auschwitz.


Things to Do Mrs & Mr Jones spent most of their time in the Old Town. The main market square is one of the largest medieval squares in Europe. It’s filled with pigeons, people and street performers and surrounded by elegant town houses, restaurants and cafes. In the run up to Christmas, the square is home to a small, but perfectly formed Christmas market.


The iconic twin spires of the 14th century St Mary’s Basilica dominate one corner of the square. Listening out for the famous bugle call, every hour, fascinated Mr Jones. The local fire brigade supplies the buglers, who, Mrs Jones thought, must have really strong calf muscles from walking up and down over 200 steps to stick their bugle out the window at the top!


They found the interior of the Basilica breathtaking with a blue ceiling filled with stars, beautiful stained glass windows and a magnificent wooden altar.


Back outside and it was starting to snow. One of the carriage drivers shouted, “special price” and the Joneses hopped onto a horse-drawn carriage. As they trotted through the medieval market square, with a blanket over their knees, Mrs Jones felt just like Cinderella.


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