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| GUEST BLOGGER |


Buying a Crane, Part 2: PONDERING PROPOSALS


GUEST BLOGGER: TAD DUNVILLE, DIRECTOR OR CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT, ACE WORLD COMPANIES


Once proposals have been gathered, it’s time to compare them and select the supplier of the right crane for the facility in question, says Tad Dunville, director of corporate development at Ace World Companies.


Tis is the second installment of a two-part article. Where the first one, published in our launch edition, guided purchasing decision makers on putting together an overhead crane specification, this part helps them compare bids. It makes the assumption that the guidance in the first article has been followed and the proposals closely match the tailored criteria as outlined in the spec. First, be mindful of the fact that selecting a crane represents a fantastic opportunity for a facility and the individual/s responsible for the decision. As I said in the first part of this blog, a purchasing decision maker might only ever have the requirement to buy, say, five or 10 cranes in their whole career. It’s a rare challenge to relish. Choosing wisely will result in enhanced productivity and safety, while the new crane will directly impact the bottom line. Promotion, career development and an incredible sense of satisfaction are all up for grabs.


MADE TO MEASURE


Clear a big space on the desk and analyze the building’s specifications and technical drawings. As much as the information one has received from the crane companies is important, it’s just as crucial to match and compare their data with the site where the crane will be installed. Has the crane builder accounted for all the requirements outlined in the spec? Have they noted the runway dimensions? What about the unique production line requirements of the facility?


Make sure the manufacturer’s name and model number is included for all parts and components, including the hoist trolley and end trucks. Tere are some independent dealers who will try to find wiggle room in specifications by down- or up-rating components. Tis will reduce the life of equipment


and result in costly, time- consuming repairs down the road even in the short term. Tere is no reason why an end user shouldn’t contact crane companies to ask for clarification or question certain bidders as to why their model numbers are different to another proposal. Go beyond that and request a detailed explanation; have them outline why those model numbers have been chosen and how that reflects the lifting demands and duty cycle of the application. It’ll soon become apparent if the components have been down rated with good reason, or not. If it’s the latter, consider where else that bidder may have cut a corner. Or better still eliminate them. As we’ve explored before, the Crane Manufacturers Association of America (CMAA), an independent incorporated trade association affiliated with Material Handling Industry (MHI), rates the duty of overhead cranes from A to F. Class A covers cranes on standby or used for infrequent service, while Class F covers continuous severe service cranes.


When comparing CMAA duty ratings, it’s important


to have access to structural and electrical detail. It doesn’t actually cost a crane builder a lot to meet electrical requirements but the additional steel and more demanding manufacturing processes involved with meeting the full criteria of, say, a Class E crane are significant by comparison. All facets of duty cycle rating should be stated.


32


DECEMBER – JANUARY 2018


INDUSTRIAL LIFTING EXCHANGE


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