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NEWS EDUCATION


5


AWARDS


Brick Awards 2017 shortlist announced


Glen Howell Architects’ London City Island, a cube-shaped campus for London College of Creative Media, and an innovatively-structured residential home in Oxfordshire are among the 85 shortlisted schemes for the 2017 Brick Awards. Whittled down from 324 entrants, shortlist highlights include Craig Tan Architects’ Stepping Stone House (pictured) and London City Island. Glenn Howell Architects’ project is a mixed-use neighbourhood that will provide over 1700 homes as well as the new English National Ballet headquarters and new facilities for The London Film School. It has been selected for Innovative Use of Brick and Clay Products & Large Housing Development.


Stepping Stone House in Henley, Oxfordshire has two nominations; the project is shortlisted for Outdoor Space and Individual Housing Development.


Shortlisted in the Worldwide Project category is Foster + Partners’ university campus of Xiao Jing Wan, which has bronze-coloured cladding and a specially developed clay brick.


Head judge Joe Morris of Duggan


Morris Architects, said the 2017 shortlist was “one of our strongest” in the awards’ 41-year history, commenting: “Year on year, the quality of design in the submissions and the quality of workmanship has steadily increased.” She added: “It is increasingly difficult to identify single stand-out award submissions.”


The judges will visit every shortlisted site and judging criteria include planning, design, and quality of construction, plus the “substantial and skilful use of brick, and how the building responds to its surroundings and purpose”.


The winners will be announced at the Brick Awards on 9 November.


Home design with a smarter edge Find out more at www.cyberhomes.co.uk/working-with-architects


Home automation • Lighting control systems • Multi-room audio and video • Home cinema design and installation CCTV and security • Data and communication networks • Occupancy simulation • Climate control


AHR building for Bath uni unveiled A 6,000 m2


building designed by


AHR at the University of Bath to house the top-ranked UK architecture school has been completed. The new £23m building for the


Department of Architecture & Civil Engineering boasts double-height studios and spacious workshop and exhibition spaces plus offices and bespoke zones for staff and students. Gary Overton, director at AHR,


said: “The University of Bath sought a robust and durable building with good proportion, befitting both engineering and architecture disciplines. Our team, including architects who have themselves taught in the Department, used their own experience to add unique value and insight.” The architects utilised a simple


pattern of pre-cast concrete frame elements repeated across a bronze anodised aluminium clad structure. “The repetition of the expressed frame creates a cohesive backdrop to the parkland setting,” commented the architects.


A luxury home must be a smart home. To integrate the latest AV, lighting and security systems into your projects, call in our award-winning team at the design stage.


0333 344 3718


hello@cyberhomes.co.uk www.cyberhomes.co.uk


ADF SEPTEMBER 2017


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