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ONE INDEPENDENCE SQUARE, LEBANON BAD


FACULTY OF FINE ART, MUSIC AND DESIGN, NORWAY SNØHETTA


, the faculty will be the second largest cultural building in the city after the Grieg Concert Hall. The building features state of the art facilities for the study of art and design including workshops for wood, ceramic, metal, paper, 3D modelling, graphics, photo lab and foundries, materials library, and a cafe. In a major step to open up the work of the faculty to the city, the new building features a project hall which rises the full height of the building. It will be programmed with public exhibitions, projects and presentations developed by the students, while the public will also have access to the library and the cafe. Ref: 26621


Internationally acclaimed Norwegian architects Snøhetta have designed the new Faculty of Fine Art, Music and Design in Bergen, Norway. The building, set to open in October, is part of the University of Bergen and will allow the departments of art and design to be housed on a single landmark site in an area overlooking the waterfront and surrounded by the seven mountains of Bergen. With a total floor space of 14,800 m2


One Independence Square is the final project on Martyrs’ Square in central Beirut. The project is designed by BAD and houses premium retail and luxury office spaces, while offering a direct access from the square, via a pedestrian ramp. BAD remarked: “Normally, architects’ challenges escalate in the building’s envelope design, yet in this case, the structural challenges took over.” The architects’ design sees the building ‘hanging’ from a superstructure that carefully considers seismic design. The facility stands on steel columns with white concrete reinforcement, while the building’s core is placed in the back facade, making it almost invisible. Ref: 11378


ZEITZ MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, SOUTH AFRICA THOMAS HEATHERWICK STUDIO


ALINGSÅS DISTRICT COURT, SWEDEN TENGBOM


The characterful 19th century brick building, which houses the Alingsås district court, was extended last year by Swedish architecture studio Tengbom. The extension’s precise appearance and the innovative use of zinc plating by the architects has garnered praise at home and even won the Metal Prize at Plåtpriset 2016, a major event devoted to metal sheeting and architecture in Sweden. Tengbom sketched the extension entirely in 3D, with a design that took inspiration from the original building, while the architects’ choice of materials accentuates and complements both facilities. The project is currently in the running for a World Architecture Festival’s Civic and Community award. Architect Fritz Olausson said: “It’s great that they were brave enough to go through with our designs and that the building is being recognised and held up as a source of inspiration.” Ref: 28438


The Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art (Zeitz MOCAA) will open to the public at Cape Town’s V&A Waterfront on 22 September as the world’s biggest museum dedicated to contemporary art from Africa and its diaspora. The museum is housed in 9,500 m2


of space over nine floors, in


the refurbished “monumental structure” of the historic Grain Silo Complex, disused since 1990. At one time the tallest building in South Africa, the galleries and cathedral-like central atrium have been “literally carved from the silos’ dense cellular structure of 42 tubes,” say the architects. Ref: 38568


ADF SEPTEMBER 2017


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


© Bjarte Bjørkum


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