search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
PROJECT REPORT: HERITAGE & HISTORIC BUILDINGS; PROJECT REPORT: SOCIAL & AFFORDABLE HOUSING


37


A former cattle market gets a sustainable overhaul with Selectaglaze secondary glazing


The first stone was laid in 1926 and it has been in constant use since its construction. Nowadays, there is an obligation to reduce


W


energy and make buildings more sustainable. Braintree Town Hall was faced with the job of making its building more energy efficient, which was not straightforward due to it being Grade II* Listed. The Town Hall approached Selectaglaze to address issues with the windows, which allowed cold air in and heat to escape. A meeting was arranged with Braintree


Town Hall and the local Conservation Officer, where an aluminium sample from Selectaglaze was set up next to one of the windows. Those in attendance were impressed at how well the timber grain effect blended in with the wood panelling. After a successful demonstration, Selectaglaze installed 20 vertical sliding units.


All products were finished with a timber grain effect that matched seamlessly with the interior. The installation of secondary glazing significantly reduces heat loss and all units are bespoke to achieve airtightness to virtually eradicate draughts. The use of low emissivity glass meant that a U-value of 1.9


illiam Julian Courtauld paid the princely sum of £50,000 to give Braintree its own Town Hall.


was easily achieved. An additional benefit of installing secondary glazing was the reduction of outside noise. “The windows contain modern thermally


efficient low emissivity glass that retains heat and the frames have been measured and manufactured to achieve an airtight fitting. The building is heated by a combination of gas central heating and electric heaters. The estimated savings from installing secondary glazing in the Town Hall is at least 12 per cent of the combined heating bill.” Councillor Robert Mitchell, Deputy


Cabinet Member for Environment and Place. Royal Warrant Holder since 2004; Selectaglaze has 50 years’ experience designing, manufacturing and installing secondary glazing for all building types to ensure that the building is warmer, quieter and safer.


01727 837271 www.selectaglaze.co.uk Mighton partner Anker Stuy gives seating a great finish in Abbey renovation


Mighton Products partner Anker Stuy Verven (ASV) has been selected as supplier of the colour stains and lacquers for the new seating as part of a prestigious yearlong renovation of Westminster Abbey that was finally completed in June of this year. As part of the interior maintenance works that took place at the iconic London landmark 2,200 wooden chairs, with the Westminster Abbey Arms embossed in to each of the backrests, were commissioned and have now become the new primary form of seating distributed throughout the building. The finish for these chairs carries a series of heavy demands and therefore required an exemplary quality lacquer capable of providing long lasting protection against candle wax, as well as tough resistance against scratches and abrasions. The 2-component ASV lacquer that was eventually specified complies with the EN 71-3 standard, certifying it free from heavy metals and even suitable for use on children's toys, as well as complying with both DIN 4102 B1 and DIN 68861 B1 standards, which demonstrates its chemical resistance. Mighton distributes Anker Stuy products to its specialist joinery customers throughout the UK.


01223 902 455 www.mightonproducts.com


Energy efficient ventilation for social housing Glidevale, has introduced iPSV®


, a humidity-sensitive, intelligent passive stack ventilation system. Designed


to combat harmful condensation, iPSV offers superior energy efficiency compared with other systems. It is ideally suited to new build social housing where performance, maintenance and lifetime costs are important considerations. iPSV has no electrical connections making installation straightforward, and requires no commissioning. With ‘intelligent’ yet simple components containing very few moving parts, the BBA approved system needs virtually no maintenance, resulting in significant lower lifetime costs. The system is controlled by responsive air inlets and extracts which react automatically to changes in relative humidity. When the condensation risk is high, the humidity-sensitive control provides an automatic boost effect to allow greater airflow. As humidity levels fall, airflow is reduced. Working silently 24 hours a day and with no operating controls, the whole-house system is less likely to be tampered with by tenants, ensuring that it runs at optimal performance and reduces the risk of costly unplanned maintenance call outs.


0161 905 5700 www.glidevale.com/ipsv


ADF SEPTEMBER 2017


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100