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The Canadian Type A ZEV market is now open with the delivery of the first Micro Bird G5 Electric


WRITTEN BY RYAN GRAY | RYAN@STNONLINE.COM F


or the past three years, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has been leading an effort to develop Accessible Canada, the country’s first federal regulations for people with disabilities. Te


country’s eight provinces have been mandated for the better part of the last 20 years to have their own acces- sibility rules in place. But they vary and do not apply, for example, to federal buildings and national parks. Or to student transportation. But the school bus industry is self-regulating, and student transporters have adopted best-practices for transporting this student population. Still, the new legis- lation that is due to go into effect in 2025 sets minimum standards, along with first-time regulations governing students with disabilities. Tat would essentially bring Canada in lock-step with the U.S. and its ADA and IDEA requirements. At the same time, the school bus industry is experienc- ing an accessibility revolution of its own. In just the past several years, nearly all of the Type-A small school bus body manufacturers have rolled out a ZEV school bus or made an announcement that they will soon. Te latest among them is Micro Bird, which is scheduled to deliver its first G5 Electric to a Toronto school bus contractor next month. Te bus was at the biennial Canadian Pupil Transpor- tation Conference in Niagara Falls, Ontario in mid-May, and so was Jack Matrosov. He is president of Wheelchair Accessible Transit, which began its operations in 2008 after being awarded four, 20-passenger school routes for the Toronto public and Catholic school boards. Te company chose Micro Bird and has been a loyal customer ever since. Of the nearly 350 vehicles the com- pany operates, about 250 are Type A Micro Bird gasoline buses. Te latest Type A will be the G5 Electric, which will go on route service when school starts on Sept. 6. “When we started off we were very small,” Matrosov


told School Transportation News. “[Micro Bird] is quality, and its service and customer orientation have always been very good.” As Matrosov and the company began researching an alternative fuel path, the logical choice for a partner was the same Drummondville, Quebec manufacturer that has specialized in Type A school buses for over 50 years. Te only problem was, he explained, there were no Type


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