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hotels special report


‘The use of recycled material was a key client requirement, and timber was salvaged from across the site, including piles of formwork beams, timber facade, and reclaimed wood from other sources’


The architect was one of a team of over 50 artists, designers


and makers that worked on the hotel’s eclectic interior, including fellow Australian firm Fender Katsalidis Architects and Japanese studio Suppose Design Office. The entire project was overseen by Fender Katsalidis Architects. The brief for the lobby was to create spaces that encourage


residents, guests and visitors to linger in what would otherwise be a transient space characterised by open space and large cylindrical structural concrete columns. March Studio’s design draws inspiration from the splendour


of the building’s construction site, a melting pot of both chaos and precision. The use of recycled material was a key client requirement, and timber was salvaged from across the site, including piles of formwork beams, cut offs from the Blackbutt (Eucalyptus pilularis) timber facade, and reclaimed wood from other sources.


BUILDING PROJECTS


www.architectsdatafile.co.uk


The practice has previously exploited the robust simplicity


of raw materials, most notably in its design for a series of stores for Aesop. The floor and ceiling of the store in Paris is covered by 3,500 planks of wood, many of which jut out to create shelves on which products are displayed. For the hotel lobby, the practice wanted to create an


instant patina using a palette of materials with character and age, primarily recycled timber, exposed concrete beams and steel panelling. In a statement, the architect commented: “The walls in the


hotel lobby, the seating, the benches, the counters, are an attempt to bring the handmade into the rigorous, polished building around it. Materials such as custom glulam timbers and precast concrete beams are allowed to sit, unadorned, stacked in a simple manner, overlapping, their joints overrunning and poking out. The singular system – the same


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