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news


Looking ahead: 3D walkthrough environments Photo: TruVision


obtaining architectural services (ideally based on the universally-recognised RIBA plan of work) that is more concise and more appropriate than PAS 91. A standard fee scale would take away the guesswork and devaluing nature of our business.


What’s your favourite medium?


I love 3D CAD drawings, love the simplicity of SketchUp and am currently learning BIM using Bentley AECOsim. But pen or pencil and paper is still the quickest, most natural, medium that can communicate more than a thousand words.


What can we learn from foreign architects?


I still believe that what we do in the UK in terms of quality, safety and wellbeing in our built environment is something we should be very proud. The novel way foreign architects tackle their own climatic conditions and topography is always refreshing, and with our country becoming generally warmer but with greater climatic swings, there’s always more to glean from our international counterparts.


What will the next “big thing” in the industry?


We’re living in exciting times, with the next level of BIM Technology, utilising


www.architectsdatafile.co.uk


latest environmentally sustainable, low carbon embodied,


energy-saving


solutions for buildings are obvious key changes facing the industry. I can envisage a wonderful future where the drawing board/computer


interface


becomes more immersive in an interactive 3D walkthrough environ- ment where building elements, fixtures and fittings can be drafted, assembled, rotated, stretched, distorted and created using interactive goggle/glasses and gloves in the next 10-15 years and holographic “design” rooms (a la Star Trek – Next Generation style) in the next 15-20 years.


How can you see an architect’s role changing?


More mature architects are realising now that we have inadvertently allowed our profession to become diluted, with many specialists


taking on


many design and administrative processes that architects previously and naturally undertook. This is partially due to buildings becoming more complex, but is also because some in our profession prefer the front end concept and feasibility “design” stages above the sometimes more challenging aspects of undertaking product information “design” and job running. I am fortunate to have maintained a good understanding of all stages of the RIBA plan of work, and I think if our profession is to be highly


valued, we have to be prepared to undertake all the less glamorous aspects of the job.


Are there limits to the part technology can play?


We are still a way off from technology being able to “think” for itself, which is no bad thing. So, tech is limited at present to how quickly information can be imputed by humans, which is invariably slower than we can use our minds. All of us have at times been frustrated waiting for images to render, print, or download. Future tech is always improving these aspects however, and if in the future, as described above, the process becomes more intuitive, speedier and crucially more fun to execute then the sky, quite literally is the limit (unless we work for NASA or ESA.


What are your hopes for 2016?


Having fun with those we work with, focusing on the projects in hand, maintaining


and existing client strengthening relationships and


hopefully obtaining commissions in the exciting new sectors Simons is starting to explore.


David Holford Wright is senior architect at Simons Design (www.simonsgroup.com)


Norman@netmagmedia.eu


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