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industry comment All designs should work on the


assumption that people with dementia will have difficulty in working things out, so making the space easy to read is very important. Which way do I turn when I leave my room? How do I find my way back? How does this shower work? What time of day or night is it? Where do I go for exercise and daylight? How can I get away from noise and stress? Do I belong here? Can I eat something now? Assume their eyesight is poor and they tire easily. Try to make life interesting and rewarding. Use classic design and don’t assume anyone is frozen in a particular time warp. The Stirling principles are laid out for


all to see, but in truth, any architectural solution that would help to answer these needs would be in line with the fundamental idea. The DSDC is a registered charity, if


you wish to support its vital work please send a donation to: www.justgiving.com/dementiaservices


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