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exterior walls, while the LLAMS building has a traditional slate roof and external walls of Metsec steel frame cladded with brick but broadly follows the design themes of the first building.


Courtyards and nature trail


The sheer of number of courtyards featured across both buildings – 11 in all – forms a strong element of the design. These include four therapy courtyards, four more gender-specific courtyards for the acute wards in the adults building, a central courtyard with public access behind the entrance building and two more in the LLAMS wing. Milling explains: “The typology of the buildings lends itself


Pictured: The timber-clad entrance and reception area is a central feature of the exterior © AFL Architects


BUILDING PROJECTS


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to the creation of courtyards. At the very least they’re visually pleasant and calm areas and where they are accessible, with seating and planting they’re great for recreation, contemplation, exercising, therapy and for patients to spend time with visitors. “We wanted to avoid installing fencing on the site, so all our courtyards are inward looking rather than outward facing


towards the perimeter. Where possible, we’ve tried to wall-round the courtyards rather than fence them off – a mod- ern interpretation of the traditional English walled garden.” As part of the landscaping, a nature trail has been created


around the perimeter of the site. This offers further recreational and meeting opportunities for patients and their visitors and softens the perimeter areas. It will also be available for use via a pedestrian entrance on the eastern side of the hospital. Landscape Architects Fabrik have devised a scheme that’s a


mixture of hard and soft landscaping areas, varied-level planting, and seating. While some of the planting will be com- pleted when the hospital opens, the idea is that patients will become involved in selecting and carrying out further planting activities on the site as part of their therapeutic treatment.


Considerable thought


Interior architecture and design has been given considerable thought, reflecting contemporary approaches to mental health services and dementia care which recognise the importance of


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