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GARDEN DESIGN


can be wonderful’, and there are indeed many instances in which I would agree. However, wind, if you will forgive me, is not one of them. As I am writing this, the wind is


WIND M


howling at gale force and the rain is horizontal. Gardens are sodden and taking a beating. There will be damage and disruption but with a little planning quite a lot can be done to help withstand our increasingly violent weather. Average wind speeds in the South West are amongst the highest in the UK. It is not perhaps surprising that they are at their strongest from November to March. On average will we can expect about 16 gales each year with gusts in excess of 70 mph. The wind typically blows from the south or south west and moves round to the west or north west as the weather system passes overhead. You need to keep this in mind when planning a


garden. If you are not directly exposed to the prevailing winds you may still find you want to create shelter. some of the less obvious benefits include: • habitat creation for wildlife. • reduction of water evaporation from plants and soil. • creation of a micro-climate giving improved growing conditions.


ae West is reputed to have said ‘Too much of a good thing


• Prevention of damage to both plants and garden buildings and structures. the first line of defence is windbreaks and shelter belts. The purpose of both is not to stop or block the wind but to filter it. if you create a solid barrier you will simply create strong eddies which can be as


bad as no shelter at all.


Windbreaks can be either man made or natural. If using fences or screens you should aim to have about 50% solid and 50% gaps. As a rule of thumb a windbreak will usually offer protection on its leeward side for a distance of 10 times its height. If you are going to use plants then younger, smaller plants will establish better than larger ones. They should be planted fairly close together in a double row. Do not include more than 50% of evergreens as they are too solid to filter the wind sufficiently. species that are particularly suitable for coastal gardens include: Hornbeam, Rowan, Hawthorn, Blackthorn, Elder, Tamarisk, European Black Pine, Monterey pine, Holm Oak, Elaeagnus x ebbingei, Pyracantha. colette@charsleydesign.com www.charsleydesign.com t: 01803 722449. m: 07774 827799. Follow me on Twitter @ColetteCharsley


Professional Landscape and Garden Design


Creative and beautiful designs for village, town and country gardens


Colette Charsley PG Dip OCGD 01803 722449 07774 827799


colette@charsleydesign.com www.charsleydesign.com


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