This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BOOK REVIEW Book Review


HISTORY – FACT OR FICTION?


This was the subject of rather a heated family discussion at the


weekend which all started over the validity of Blackadder as an historical source of information. Unsurprisingly, the discussion was fuelled by food and wine but the question of how subjective or objective a historian should be still remains. With this in mind and with the arrival of a number of interesting historical books on the shelves, this month’s choice focuses on a range of books, which do their best to inform, inspire and even entertain. If you think you know London, think again and take a look at Georgian London: Into the Streets by Lucy Inglis (£20; Viking). This blog- turned-book is written by a young and talented new historian, which focuses very much on everyday 18th Century life. The author takes its readers on a tour of London’s most formative age – the age of love, sex, intellect, art, great ambition and fantastic ruin. Each chapter concentrates on different areas of the city and includes snippets of interesting facts mixed with a pithy wit. The Evening Standard calls it “fast, fun and factual” and with


her in-depth research and pacey style it can’t fail to inform and entertain. Our publisher, Mark’s own recommendation of the month


is Catastrophe: Europe Goes to War (£30; William Collins) by Max Hastings.


prominent war historian and in his latest book he tackles the complex lead-up to and opening weeks of the First World War. As you would expect, the detail is remarkable and interspersed with personal experiences - it gives a vivid and compelling account of what happened to millions of men and women during the first months of war. according to the Observer it’s “Very readable. Character, pace, sense of landscape, battlefield detail – all are superbly done … it’s a splendid read.”


And then there is family history – a subject that has always fascinated me and always seems to uncover those hidden skeletons in the cupboard. If you liked Suite Francaise, Agent Zigzag or books by Sebastian Faulks why not take a look at Priscilla: The Hidden Life of an Englishwoman in Wartime France (£18.99; Harvil Secker) by


Open all year but times vary seasonally.


12 Higher Street (opposite The Cherub Inn) 01803 839571


info@dartmouthcommunitybookshop.co.uk www.dartmouthcommunitybookshop.co.uk


55


A not-for-profit co-operative organised by volunteers.


The author is arguably Britain’s most by Emma Jones


Nicholas Shakespeare. It is the astonishing true story of a young woman’s adventures and misadventures in the dangerous world of Nazi-occupied France. The author is Priscilla’s nephew who unwittingly came across a box of his late aunt’s belongings. he sought to find the truth behind his mysterious and beguiling aunt who wasn’t really as she seemed but the reality was nonetheless intriguing. John le Carré calls it “a portrait of one very ordinary person’s frailty in the face of terrible odds.” And if you’re looking for something more local, the book on


everyone’s Christmas list has to be An Enchanted Place by Joslin Fiennes (£35; Antique Collectors Club in association with Richard Webb). It is the latest cultural history of our hometown including a treasure trove of painting, sculpture, poetry and adventure. A real gem with some new and interesting heritage uncovered and by all accounts an essential part of the Dartmouth History Collection. And for a bit of light relief why not try out the literary quiz at


www.abebooks.co.uk. answer a few questions and you’ll find out which fictional character from literature you most resemble. I’m apparently Lucy from The Chronicles of Narnia – trusting and intensely loyal – and always keen to see what’s at the back of the wardrobe!


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116