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Advertising feature RULE BRITANNIA! at Bearnes Hampton & Littlewood ‘R


ule Britannia’ has long been one of the most popular songs at the Last Night of the Proms,


with its rousing patriotic and historic connotations. It is with a similar feeling of Britain’s naval heritage that Bearnes Hampton & Littlewood’s specialist Maritime Auction continues to attract a successful following. Though it has been over 200 years


since Admiral Nelson’s victory and death at the battle of Trafalgar, the legacy of ‘The Golden Age of sail’ continues today in the 21st century. International bidders were attracted to the great man’s signature on an Admiralty issue of command regarding the upkeep of Royal Naval vessels.


Competitive bidding in


the room and online took the eventual price to £5,300. A 19th century Parian bust of Nelson by Joesph Pitts of London also sold to a Nelson enthusiast for £780.


It is not until you begin to look into the history of the naval battles of the 18th century, that you begin to see their


significance and the reason that these events form such a part of our National Heritage. After the glorious revolution of 1688 when James II was overthrown and William III ascended to the throne, the political map of europe was thrown into turmoil, it began a series of wars with France that lasted over a century. Britain’s colonies and their trade routes became the main targets for repeated attacks from spain and France culminating in the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars 1793-1815. Napoleon blocked european ports to english trade ships, as well as ordering privateers to engage British trade ships in the West Indies. In such a delicate position the Royal Navy’s victories at the Battle of Cape Vincent, The Battle of the Nile and finally at Trafalgar, prevented the loss of england’s sovereignty and its economic dominance. A nation relieved that it would not


have to learn French celebrated with victory celebrations as well as mourning the loss of a great hero. These pieces are still highly collectable; e.g. a series of reverse glass paintings of Nelson’s death and funeral procession were produced, which regularly fetch £200 plus, with


some rarer examples reaching 4 figures. ships’ fixtures and fittings are still popular. With plenty of ships’ clocks and barometers to choose from, it was the more unusual signal cannon that caught buyers’ attention at £1,000 and an engine room telegraph for £550. Antiques are like buses; one piece comes along, another example follows. A Royal Doulton Lambeth salt glazed stoneware advertising paperweight for the Trafalgar Towing Co., modelled as the tug boat Glory, attracted a lot of attention from buyers to reach £1,000. seeing the result of this piece prompted another example to be brought in for the following auction, which sold again for the same price to a different collector. Already consigned for the next auction


are a number of ships’ bells, scrimshaw and maritime pictures.


For further information or valuation on Maritime items, please contact Brian Goodison-Blanks on 01392 413100.


ANTIQUES


REGULAR ANTIQUES VALUATION DAYS IN KINGSBRIDGE


Please telephone (01392) 413100 for further details


Home visits available


Valuations for Sale, Insurance & Probate Sold for £21,000


St. Edmund’s Court, Okehampton Street, Exeter. EX4 1DU W: www.bhandl.co.uk


01392 413100 E: enquiries@bhandl.co.uk Follow us on Twitter: @BHandL 57


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