This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
The Junior Tour of Northern California


Where Golf’s Future Happens Now


think it’s one of the best things the NCGA has ever done,” said Cal men’s golf head coach Steve Desimone. “The quality of the tour keeps get- ting better and better. So for college coaches, it’s been great.” How great? We decided to catch up with past


Junior Tour stars. The brightest Junior Tour star is


BRYSON DECHAMBEAU, who has climbed into the top 30 of the world amateur rankings. The 2011 JTNC Boys Player of the Year used that season to launch an impressive collegiate and amateur career. Representing the United States


T


he Junior Tour of Northern Cali- fornia is jumping into its fi fth season. In that time, it has grown from a humble eight tourna-


ments to a thriving schedule of 25, spanning 10 months of the year. The Junior Tour was created in 2011 when the NCGA and North- ern California PGA combined their respective tours to create a single tour where juniors could compete against the best players for an affordable price. Despite being in only its fi fth season, the Junior Tour, sponsored by Capital Insurance Group, has quickly risen through the ranks to become a top circuit where juniors can hone their games, and also catch the eye of a college recruiter. “The growth of the tour has been


a great story in Northern California golf. It’s giving local kids opportuni- ties they wouldn’t have otherwise. I


60 / NCGA.ORG / FALL 2014


this September in the World Amateur Team Championships, DeChambeau shot a championship-record 61. He then made the decisive birdie on the fi nal hole to give the U.S. their record 15th win, while also helping them set a new scoring record. “The experience I had at the


JTNC helped me get to a higher level of play as well as a higher standard of my character,” said DeChambeau, who also fi nished runner up at the 2013 California State Amateur. “The JTNC was a great stepping stone to my golf game now.”


The SMU junior was named to the


2014 PING All-America second team this spring, and was selected to play for the U.S. in the 2014 Palmer Cup. He also had 12 top 10s in 14 tournaments, including eight top 5s. DeChambeau’s summer included


a trip to the Round of 16 at the U.S. Public Links Amateur Champion- ship, and advancing to the quarterfi - nals at the U.S. Amateur. A win at the 2013 Trans-Mississippi also helped DeChambeau make the leap into the top 30 of the world rankings.


But DeChambeau is not alone in


using JTNC success as a launching pad for even bigger things.


Here are other alumni who are just getting started:


PAIGE LEE A sophomore at UC Davis, Lee was part of the “teenage takeover” at the 2014 U.S. Women’s Open. Lee and current JTNC member Lucy Li were two of 22 teens to make the fi eld. One of only three players in UC Davis history to qualify for the U.S. Women’s Open, the Folsom resident was a First-Team All-Big West pick this season, and fi nished second on the team with fi ve Top 10s to help the Aggies win their fi fth straight Big West crown. While at Granite Bay High, the former JTNC winner captured an unprecedented four San Joaquin Section high school individual titles. She also won the 2013 NCGA Women’s Amateur Championship. “Paige has been working hard and has re- ally improved over several categories,” UC Davis head coach Anna Temple said. “She is starting to see that pay off .”





PHOTO: LINDSEY NOVITZKE


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76