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ay goodbye to the days where learning about Science, Technology, Engineering and Math


(STEM) was limited to worksheets, textbooks, and vinegar/baking soda volcanoes. Enter Chevron STEM ZONE - where learning is disguised by hands-on activities that engage students through their natural curiosity. “Te amazing thing about STEM is that it is


at work all around us,” said Steve Green, vice president of Policy, Government and Public Affairs for Chevron, “including in the sports you watch and play.” Trough their multimedia exhibit – known as the STEM ZONE – Chevron demonstrates the science of golf at numerous tournaments throughout the country each year. Youth participants investigate air pressure, range of motion, biofeedback, momentum, agronomy, aerodynamics and thermal imaging - all with direct ties to the game of golf. Te overall goal is to make STEM approachable.


“Our goal is to make STEM fun,” Green reported.


“Te kids that come through are learning all sorts of technical and scientific information, but they don’t always realize that - because to them, it’s just fun. We believe STEM education is a national imperative – it is vital to


innovation and our country’s overall economic strength and competitiveness,” Green said. “Our efforts to support STEM education aim to arm students with the critical skills they need to succeed in their future careers— whether at Chevron or in other industries.” Chevron has supported


numerous Youth on Course scholarships for individuals entering STEM fields of study. In 2014, Youth on Course had 16 such scholarship recipients. By


providing access to fun learning opportunities, Chevron


hopes to inspire youth to explore careers in STEM. Youth on Course is proud to partner with Chevron, and con- tinue to expose youth to STEM education opportunities. Golf may seem like just another sport – but it can open up a whole


host of learning opportunities. -Youth on Course Staff


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