This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
PAlife BUSINESS TRAVEL SHOW POLICY MATTERS


THERE ARE SO MANY ISSUES TO CONSIDER WHEN PUTTING TOGETHER A COMPREHENSIVE TRAVEL PROGRAMME, IT CAN BE DIFFICULT TO DECIDE ON THE RIGHT WAY TO RUN IT AND HOW TO GET THE BEST VALUE FOR YOUR COMPANY. PETER NIXON GUIDES YOU THROUGH THE PROCESS


ET’S START WITH THE BASICS – you need to put in place a travel policy for employees to follow. This will cover how travel is booked, with


whom, and should provide details of spend limits and the authorisation process required. It should also refl ect your company values in relation to your duty of care and any environmental concerns. You then need to decide how to communicate and mandate this policy, and what you will do if staff veer off this agreed plan. This is where you might start to consider the use of a specialist travel management company (TMC) who can implement your policy both at the time of booking and also through retrospective reporting. We have just mentioned duty of care,


so let’s examine exactly what a company’s responsibilities are in this area. The fi rst thing to stress is that the care of your travellers when on company business is a legal obligation. This means that your travel policy and programme must evaluate any risks (particularly when


TRAVELLERS IS A LEGAL OBLIGATION


THE CARE OF YOUR BUSINESS


travelling in less developed regions), mandate and enforce compliance where possible, include in-company training or induction, and ensure you can communicate with travellers effectively and quickly in times of crisis by knowing where they are. This last point is particularly important and


diffi cult to achieve with an ad hoc approach, if you have more than just a few regular business travellers. Again, this is where a TMC can assist


NEED TO KNOW FIVEKEYELEMENTSTOA


WINNINGTRAVELPROGRAMME 1


Get your travel policy right 2


Understand your duty of care obligations


3


Provide choice within certain parameters


4


If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it


5


Take time to decide if you need the help of an outside agency


Peter Nixon is Commercial Manager at


Business Travel Direct. For further advice on formulating a travel programme, visit businesstraveldirect.co.uk


with traveller tracking and proactive security alerts. But what can you do if your manager prefers to use certain airlines and hotels because of loyalty schemes and individual preference, meaning you always need to have a choice of supplier? This is not necessarily a problem in a well-formulated travel programme, because it should actually increase the amount of choice while also allowing particular preferences to be


PROGRAMME SHOULD INCREASE THE AMOUNT OF CHOICE


A TRAVEL


accommodated. What it will also do is ensure you can negotiate the best rates with suppliers and get potential benefi ts for the company, not just the individual business traveller. If you do choose to use a TMC, it should


be able to offer a wide range of options, advise which schemes will benefi t you most and potentially negotiate on your behalf. It can also save you a mountain of time and be available to fi eld requests 24/7, meaning that you don’t have to be. This leads us nicely to our fi nal point – do


you need to use an agency or can a company successfully run its own travel programme? In a smaller organisation with just a few business travellers, many of the above elements can be achieved in-house through the use of online booking sites. If you are happy to utilise no-frills carriers and budget hotels, best value can normally be secured by going direct. However, you should balance this against the expertise, convenience and savings a reputable TMC can offer as your travel requirements expand and change.


PALIFE.CO.UK


♦ 43 ♦


JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2013 • PALife


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54