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MotoAmerica races are split up into five


classes. At the slowest end of the spec- trum—not that any of these bikes could be considered slow in the classic sense—are the circuit’s youngest riders. They compete in the KTM RC Cup, and they ride identi- cal, single-cylinder KTM RC 390 motorcy- cles. The bikes are simple and the same, which enables the riders to build their skills in a highly competitive environment dedi- cated to the physical art of racing, rather than trying to outmaneuver each other technologically. Building on the idea that skill,


rather than technology, can be the focus of a racing series, MotoAmer- ica also features two classes based on stock motorcycles of 600 and 1000 cc displacement that basically anybody can buy at their local dealer. In the Superstock classes, only a few modi- fications to the bikes are allowed, and they are basically bolt-on changes, such as suspension and electronics modules. The engines and transmis- sions must be as supplied by the fac- tory and be widely available to riders in general. In the Superbike (1000 cc) and Supers-


port 600 classes, MotoAmerica rules allow all sorts of engine modifications, from pol- ishing connecting rods to lightening crank- shafts. While all race bikes can be expensive, it’s the Superbike and Supersport motorcy- cles that come with high-dollar price tags and, quite often, factory and sponsor support. Many of the riders in the Superstock classes are known as “privateers” in the


The start.


racing world. While they may have spon- sors, they’re pretty much doing things on their own. This is where Jeremy Cook enters the picture. Cook is one of only two BMW riders in


MotoAmerica. Along with airline pilot and former Suzuki and Ducati factory rider Steve Rapp, Cook has naturally drawn the attention of BMW riders in the U.S. The MOA sponsors Cook, enabling him to


“Unfortunately, the second race of my


second year I had a massive highside at the top of the roller-coaster at Virginia Interna- tional Raceway, which resulted in a med- evac flight to Duke [University], shock trauma ICU for nine days as they tried to save my right arm, and six months of physi- cal therapy. I swore off racing but shortly found myself looking into race schools,” Cook said.


A chance meeting with Nate Kern


at the inaugural MotoGP races at Indianapolis in 2008 led to Cook put- ting a deposit down on an S 1000 RR at Bob’s BMW in Jessup, Maryland. Cook’s next step was a rain-soaked California Superbike School week in which he split the riding between his Suzuki GSX-R1000 and brand-new S 1000 RR. After selling the Gixxer, he put in a season with the Champion- ship Cup Series as an amateur, win- ning several regional and track championships. As an Expert the fol- lowing season, he was able to get enough points to earn his AMA Pro


travel from race to race and transport his motorcycles, spare parts and supplies in a large enclosed trailer. His other sponsors include Bob’s BMW and Schuberth. Cook is a Marine Corps veteran who,


after getting out of the service in 2004, needed something to keep himself busy. He was misbehaving on motorcycles on the street with his friends and recognized that behavior wasn’t constructive. He took a chance on a track day and enjoyed it so much he got licensed and started racing the very next weekend.


Supersport, Daytona Sportbike and Pro Superbike licenses—just before MotoAmer- ica took over the series. “MotoAmerica is BIG!” Cook said. “The


TV coverage and number of fans and spec- tators that show up add a lot to the stress.” The last round of the season takes place


September 9-11 at the New Jersey Motors- ports Park, located south of Millville, New Jersey, next to Millville Airport, a former Army Air Corps facility used to train P-40 and P-47 pilots during World War II. NJMP is a 500-acre facility that sports two tracks


86


BMW OWNERS NEWS September 2016


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