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A few miles out of Barneveld we found


Mill Road, which leads to the Hyde Mill. This water-powered grist mill was built in 1850, and while no longer operating, the building and race are still there, as well as old millstones and other pieces placed around. This is a special, peaceful place favored by photographers. Another good spot for lunch is the Pleas-


ant Ridge Store. The former general store- turned-eatery off Cty ZZ features great sandwiches and specials, and the artwork on the walls features old motorcycle posters and memorabilia. As we headed north on Hwy 23 we


entered Frank Lloyd Wright country. Popu- lar stops are the Hillside School, associated with this famous architect, and Taliesin, Frank Loyd Wright’s “eastern” home and the site of an architecture school in the past (tours must be arranged in advance). Right around the corner is the Frank Loyd Wright Preservation Center (one of the very few restaurants designed by him) which has a visitor center. Tower Hill state park is just up from the center. The “tower” was used to form round lead shot for military use in the


Memorabilia covers the walls of the Pleasant Ridge Store.


1800s. Hwy 23 took us across the Wisconsin


River and into Spring Green. It has a nice, revitalized downtown, with several nice eateries and places worth checking out. We followed Hwy 23 to US 14 and then Hwy 60 which offers sweeping curves, unlike the writhing back roads we'd been riding thus far and ran us back east on the north side of the Wisconsin River. This part of Highway 60 was the first corridor to be designated a Wisconsin Scenic Byway. The sweeping


curves of Highway 60 wind 100 miles through the heart of southwest Wisconsin’s rural Driftless Area, from Lodi to Prairie du Chien as they follow the Lower Wisconsin River. Our next stop (and a popular tourist des-


tination) was the Wollersheim Winery near Prairie du Sac. The first person to try wine- making here was a Hungarian count, Agos- ton Haraszthy, whose European vines didn't survive the midwest winter. He moved on to try again in California, and the rest, as


Hyde's Mill.


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