search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
aviation section of the museum which fea- tures dozens of model planes, including a model of the Wright brothers’ first plane and a full-size 1932 Pietenpol. Continue south on Hwy 27 to Cashton,


pick up Hwy 33, and you’re in for some of the most memorable rides of your life. Tak- ing Hwy 33 east for a few miles will lead you to Wisconsin’s answer to The Tail of the Dragon, up and over Wildcat Mountain. Just for the fun of it, I like to turn around and head right back over the mountain and back to Ontario, then turn south on Hwy 131, a favorite of many riders for its pleasant sweepers and gorgeous scenery. Hwy 131 cuts through the


Kickapoo Valley Reserve, 8,569 acres of sandstone cliffs and forested bluffs towering over the sweeping valleys cra- dling the Kickapoo River. Rec- ognized as a National Natural Landmark, a State Natural Area, and prime wetland habi- tat for birds and other wildlife, the Reserve also has a fascinat- ing history. Back in the ‘60s, in response to periodic flooding problems (probably due in some part to logging and farming activities), a congress-initiated program called for the river to be dammed with the idea of creating a recreational resource and sparing downstream commu- nities from flooding. Over 140 families sold or were forced to sell their homes and


businesses. Construction began, but soon budget and environmental concerns halted the project, and though some huge concrete structures eerily still rise from the valley, most of the Reserve has returned to its nat- ural state. A visitor’s center for the Kicka- poo Valley Reserve is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday. Just before leaving the reserve heading


working shops, and quaint cabins speckle this area, but keep an eye out for buggies and of course the occasional horse manure deposit! If you skip Cty P, leaving the Reserve on


south 131 you’ll pass Wildthings Fur Com- pany, where you can pick up locally-caught smoked trout and watch hats, caps, mittens, and motorcycle seat covers being made from everything from wolver- ine to wolf fur. A block down the highway is the “ALMOST world famous” Rockton Bar, where its renowned chicken barbecue packs its parking lot each Sunday with both two- wheeled and four-footed trans- portation (There are many equestrians in this area). Another Rustic Road in the


The “ALMOST World Famous” Rockton Bar on State Highway 131 packs in riders, both motorcyclist and equestrian, on Sunday for its Sunday chicken barbecues.


south, on the advice of a local rider I took a left on Cty P. This little stretch from 131 over to Hwy 82 will give you all the twisties you could ever want. As you round one of the countless bends bordered by rocky out- croppings, you may feel as you’ve ridden suddenly into the 1800s. Working Amish farms, small bakeries, produce and wood


area I’d recommend meets Hwy 131 just as you leave the Reserve to the south. The Rustic Roads sign there clearly marks its beginning at Dutch Hollow Road, but watch the signs care- fully, as Dutch Hollow magi- cally turns into Sand Hill Road. Turn right at Lower Ridge Road, which will lead you back


to Highways 131 and 33 and into Ontario, which is proclaimed by its welcome sign to be “The Canoeing Capital of the World.” This side tour has some great elevations providing scenic overlooks and threads its way past Amish farms and horse stables. Located to the west on Hwy 82 is Hills- boro, a common rallying point for groups


State Highway 33 takes riders up and over Wildcat Mountain and is typical of the rollercoaster roads found in southwestern Wisconsin, offering dramatic overlooks, twisted switchbacks and sprawling sweepers.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124