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TECH


keepemflying


fill-drain plug threads for the drive- shaft, should they be damaged. These two plugs, located where the drive- shaft mates with the rear drive, are the second-most commonly stripped fasteners on the bike. It is a fairly easy Heli-Coil fix but the drive needs to be off the bike and with parts removed. The MOST common stripped fastener? The valve cover stud in the heads. At least that one is a very easy Heli-Coil repair. Susanna and I are packing up for


the rally and will take off tomorrow. We’re going by car, alas, but between my challenges and the fact we’ll be continuing on to see grandkids and other family on the East Coast, it makes sense to use four wheels. When we return from that trip, my next project will be changing the bat- teries in my electric three-wheeler from lead-acid to lithium-ion (from a wrecked Chevy Volt). More power, more range, half the weight and lon- ger life. This should be worth the extra cost involved. And, after that we WILL, as mentioned, take the bikes on a leisurely ride to Boise and back.


This particular rear drive had a buggered up driveshaft fill plug. With hard sharp steel threads in a small soft aluminum hole, this is a commonly stripped fastener. I did the initial drilling using a drill press and fixture to get a good 90 degree hole. Now, I'm cutting the threads prior to installing a 12mm HeliCoil to restore the fill threads.


I am cleaning up the connections on the 35-year-old wiring for my self-installed pair of circuit breakers. I'd started having electrical gremlins a week or two earlier. A couple of new connectors, some sandpaper and a little dielectric grease later, the problem has been banished.


The gas line intake spigot can come loose, generating a rather hard-to-find gas leak. It had worked about 1/3 loose, exposing the black o-ring.


I


ended up cleaning it up and tapping it back into place, which stopped gas from dripping on the riders' foot. That o-ring is not available separately so if it needs replacing, the real-world solution would be to find a scrap carburetor and salvage a good used one. First time in 44 years!


52


BMW OWNERS NEWS September 2016


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