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match my turquoise baseball hat emblazoned with “Broadmoor Fishing Camp.” My casts get smoother, but the fl y on my line still doesn’t tempt any fi sh. Scott’s sidekick, Blue, a 3-month-old golden retriever, sticks his button-size nose in the water searching for fi sh. Nothing. Scott grabs the net he uses to capture fi sh reeled in on a line and places a small weave bag, which he calls a seine, over it. As he sweeps the net through the water to scoop up bugs, he tells me, “My seine is the portal to the fi shing gods.” He picks out a mayfl y, a caddis and then a stonefl y from the dozens


of miniscule bugs trapped in the strands and thrusts them toward me in a hand battered from tying fl ies. The fi sh, bugs and the river are one big ecosystem, he explains, tying together the life cycle of the bugs as calories for the fi sh. “You are matching the natural bio- mass found throughout the diff erent sections of water you are fi shing in. This is critical to a successful day of fl y-fi shing.” Listening, I’m discovering that a day on


the water is more than catching trout. His joy of fl y-fi shing bubbles over: “Every day you’re on the river, you get to watch the whole world being reborn. I have the coolest job ever.”


BEST SHOTS


The Southwest off ers hunters a bounty of options. While these choice locales may not promise success, they do off er plenty of opportunity BY PETER O’DOWD


The San


Francisco Peaks North of Flagstaff , Arizona


The San Francisco Peaks tower more than 12,000 feet over Flagstaff . Native Americans have revered the range for centuries, and it’s easy to see why. The Peaks Hunt area is mostly off - limits to vehicles. Travel on foot or horseback through Alpine meadows and groves of quaking aspen and ponderosa pine.


WILDLIFE: Hunters come for the trophy elk, but watch for mule deer and Merriam’s turkeys.


WHEN TO GO: This is a physi- cally challe nging hunt. Get into shape and go in the fall when the elk are rutting and the aspens are at their golden peak.


TOOLS OF THE TRADE The author and Scott inspect their seine, a small-weave bag that sweeps through the water to collect fl ies. Opposite: The reels, rods, hooks, fl ies, fi shing line and nets needed for a day on the river.


JULY/AUGUST 2015 • DORADO 55


ILLUSTRATIONS BY CLAIRE McCRACKEN


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