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PRIME EATS


Be sure to visit these vendors on your next trip to the Santa Fe Farmers Market BY STEPHANIE PEARSON


SHOP AROUND From grass-fed organic beef to fresh-roasted green chile to bunches of fl owers, the Santa Fe Farmers Market is a kaleidoscope of culinary experiences, especially in the summer. Chefs from all across the city scope out the produce, retirees shop for Santa Fe Opera parties and young families stroller around for the week’s grocery supply.


Green Tractor Farm


On their La Cienega farm Mary and Tom Dixon, along with daughter Rachel, grow some of the most coveted veggies at the market, including greens, peppers, radishes and tomatoes.


Red Mesa Meats sa M


Proprietor Jim Whitaker sells a smoky sweet sausage


mixed with a secret blend of spices he concocted at the request of the famed Cafe Pasqual’s near the Plaza. To make eating and shopping easy, it’


, it’s served on a stick.


his coveted arugula or artisanal goat cheese, but it’s nearly impossible not to fi rst stop off at Café Fresh, the hub in the middle of the pavilion, where shoppers are lined up for organic Whoo’s Donuts (try the maple bacon with dark chocolate glaze and chile brown sugar), hand-held green-chile breakfast burritos and steaming cups of organic coff ee. Almost every U.S. city off ers its own vari-


ation of a farmers market, but few have set the bar as high as Santa Fe: 80 percent of the vendors here are required to off er minimally processed agricultural goods, and all of the vendors must grow, raise or produce their goods within the 15 northern counties of New Mexico. And that includes the wheat in the


bakery products, the fruit in the jams and the meat from the lamb. Further, the person who grew it also has to sell it — no resellers are allowed here. These strict rules and the farmers who abide by them are why you’ll be rubbing elbows every week with some of the fi nest chefs in Santa Fe, from Roland Richter of Joe’s Dining — an old-school, classic diner with a sustainable, local food twist on the city’s south side — to Andrew Cooper of Four Seasons Resort’s Terra in the foothills north of town. Add Matt Yohalem of Il Piatto and Patrick Gharrity from La Casa Sena, two long-standing greats, and you’ll need to arrive early enough before they buy the place out.


Rey Romero Farm Rey Romero may not have


y Romero F


much to say, but his just-right roasted green chile stands out among standouts, which speaks for i speaks for itselftself.


Red Mountain Farm


At his farm in Abiquiu, the famed one-time home of artist Georgia O’Keeff e, Jeff Nitz goes above and beyond stone-grinding polenta from grains that he has grown.


JULY/AUGUST 2015 • DORADO 47


ILLUSTRATIONS BY CLAIRE McCRACKEN


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