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et’s go throw some fur,” my fishing guide says with a big grin. Startled, I have to think for a minute before remembering that Scott Tarrant makes all his flies with fur and feathers, each one designed to look like the bugs trout consider prime meals.


“I lash pieces of animal fur and feathers


together onto a hook and make it look like the invertebrates in the water — then try and trick the trout into eating them,” he explains. Sounds simple. Yes? Well, not exactly, for a


newbie like me. I lurch after him, catching my long fly rod on a bush, as we walk to a private stretch of water on the Tarryall Creek in front of the Broadmoor Fishing Camp. I feel like I’m in kindergarten again learning my ABCs, so I mentally clutch onto Scott’s remark that fly-fishing is really easy. (A comment I later realize is an oversimplification.)


54 DORADO • JULY/AUGUST 2015


Scott, who has been guiding for more than 20 years and is now general manager of the new Broadmoor Fishing Camp, puts a stonefly nymph lure on my line and a mayfly nymph a few feet below, explaining we are going dry fly-fishing. He shows me how to roll cast, a technique used when you’re standing among bushes and trees. I promptly catch my fly on a bush sticking out of the river. He cheerfully wades in and pulls it loose. Cast your line in the water, mend it slowly so it looks like the bug is drifting, I chant to myself quietly. No tugs. Whip it out and flick the line in again. He does it so gracefully — why can’t I? “We’re not casting the fly. We’re casting the


line,” he says. “We’re just creating potential energy, then converting it to kinetic energy. Let the rod shoot the line out to the trout.” After he grabs my hand and guides me through the flow of the movement, I begin to get it. Each time, my line goes out farther.


Emboldened, I wade into the water. Stepping carefully on the rocky riverbed, I feel like the Michelin Man, stuffed into waders with turquoise Neoprene booties that


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