This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
“It’s more of an active form of


meditation. It’s about being there in the moment, and nothing else really matters except the next step.”


at its hundreds of campsites, but recently the community has made a more concerted effort to embrace the sport. Unlike some cities that have banned slacklining in public parks mainly out of concern for trees, Moab opened a dedicated park for the activity in 2013. And thanks to an abundance of canyons and tower-like rock formations, the area beyond city limits now features hundreds of estab- lished locations for highlines. “It’s the biggest mecca for highlining in the world,” says


Brian Mosbaugh, a Moab-based professional slackliner who has helped pioneer many areas with the Moab Monkeys, a group of young local adventurers. To celebrate the sport, eight years ago,


Mosbaugh and several other local slacklin- ers started an informal annual gathering called Gobble Gobble Bitches Yeah. Held on the flat rocks surrounding the Fruit Bowl canyon, in an area overseen by the


Bureau of Land Management, the event takes place the week of Thanksgiving. At first, only about a dozen people showed up, but over the years, word spread. Now, several hundred people appear, including world record holders and elite athletes. “When I first started, I was really freaked out,”


says Ray Diaz, a semi-professional slackliner from San Clemente, California. “But you learn how to manage the fear. I had this realization that highlining is the same exact thing as slacklining in the park. You break through that barrier.” Although highliners are clipped by harness to the line, they often catch themselves when falling to avoid extra stress on the equipment, which is typically retired after a certain number of falls. Come evening, slackliners gather around campfires and those with guitars lazily riff chords and melodies. They feel the air temperature drop and watch the stars freckle the clear sky. In the morning, they awake to do it all over again, emerging from tents to marvel at the giant dome of blue overhead, the spectacular sweeps of water-carved sand- stone, and the beautiful, sinuous limbs of ancient-seeming trees — a fine backdrop for a moving meditation. “Being out there in the canyonlands,


THE GREAT OUTDOORS For more of our favorite Southwestern adventures, visit doradomagazine.com/greatoutdoors.


it’s so quiet it feels like you can hear the hum of the universe,” Diaz says. “The scen- ery is unbelievable. You can’t even take in what you’re seeing. I wake up and I’m like, ‘Wow, this place has serious magic.’”


MARKETPLACE


VISIT ONLINE


Shop for the products, places and experiences featured in our magazine. Products chosen by our staff and select advertisers.


WWW.DORADOMAGAZINE.COM/MARKETPLACE


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84