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A WELCOME SIGHT Specially designed trails, colorful plantings and outdoor art installations lead to the guesthouse.


exploring new things,” he says. “They treated this a little bit like an art piece — they were creating an environment.” An engineering success, the Klein home’s sheer walls of glass ultimately fuse the indoors with the outdoors, realizing their goal of living in the natural setting. “As you sit there you get this gorgeous view of the mountains and you get to see the changing colors and storms coming in — it’s just so beautiful to be able to experience this glass,” says Jeanne. The profusion of glass, however, also delivers a


plethora of light into the house, creating a challenge for showcasing the Kleins’ artwork. “Most collectors build houses with beautiful, elegant white rooms with light that is very controlled,” says DuBois. “But then you can’t really appreciate the home’s natural setting. We had the challenge of embracing the landscape but making the art really sing.” Concrete was used as an unusual yet highly effective


backdrop for the Kleins’ collection. “I didn’t know how much I would love the gray background for my art when I was used to white backgrounds,” says Jeanne. “I love the texture and color of the concrete as a backdrop.” Much of the featured artwork is located in long hall-


ways that are protected from light variations. In addition, a long, frosted glass sunshade was built through the cen- ter of the house to temper the strong New Mexico light. “The sun in Santa Fe is so intense we needed to filter it,” says DuBois. “The sunscreen that runs the whole length


38 DORADO • JULY/AUGUST 2015


of the house softens the light and also creates a porch underneath it.” The Turrell Skyspace —a cube that is 20 feet by


20 feet by 20 feet with a sky viewing space cut from the top and open to elements — also required special consideration to integrate it into the home. “It’s such a simple thing, but it is so powerful,” says DuBois, who sank the Skyspace area 4 feet into the ground with stairs for access. “Turrell makes us appreciate how our perception works.” The Kleins’ collection also extends outside the home into the natural land surrounding it. “We made trails around the house with Andy Goldsworthy, and we have five pieces of his art there,” Jeanne says. “We also have extended trails with installations by other artists — those trails hook up with the National Forest trails.” In the end, the Kleins have realized their dream to live


with art and nature. “Different years, different weeks, I change my mind on what I love most about this home,” Jeanne says. “But there is no question that my favorite thing is that I live with the art every day — and every day I am walking through art.”


HOME TOUR: CABIN FEVER


See how one family transformed a dark, dated cabin into a contemporary retreat at doradomagazine.com/cabinfever.


FRANK OUDEMAN


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