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Joanne Moody Principal


Zeta Scientifi c LLC SME Member Since 1990


SME SPEAKS GUEST EDITORIAL S Annual Event Helps Predict Next Big Thing


ME’s Silicon Valley Chapter 98 exists in a very com- petitive innovation ecosystem in the Silicon Valley in California with Apple, Facebook, Google and Tesla to name a few of the global leaders in technology. It’s also a hotbed for biotechnology innovations through several local universities, startups and national laboratories. To demonstrate the chapter’s innovative abilities and cre-


ate more visibility in the San Francisco Bay Area, in 2006 we developed our own annual conference, which was designed to help predict the “next big thing.” We’ve also aligned the yearly theme to echo the rapidly changing technological landscape in the Silicon Valley. This year’s theme is “Transforming the Future—IoT, 3D Printing, and Robotics,” with a wide range of industries from biomedical to the future with driverless cars. Our one-day conference will be held June 9 at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, in conjunction with the two-day Northern California Design-2-Part Show, one of the largest trade shows in our region exclusively focused on contract manufacturing services. This particular event features about 200 US contract manufacturing compa- nies in more than 300 product categories. Our conference attendees fi nd the D2P trade show a must-see, and they attend to gain connections with vendors that will aid them in their product development and manu- facturing. Manufacturing and product design are obviously changing at an astounding rate, and nowhere is the speed more evident than here in the Silicon Valley. The impact of the Internet of Things (IoT), 3D printing and robotics is huge, and we’re now just seeing the infl uence of the digital revolution in our daily lives as well as in industry. IoT, integrated software tools, 3D printing and robotics have continued to develop and merge together, making manufacturing more fl exible and competitive with less fi xed tooling, lower space requirements and improved controls.


Because there’s so much changeover taking place, we’ve also mapped the range of conference topics to match the Silicon Valley’s leading-edge technologies, innovations and workplace needs. We’ve found ourselves more involved with additive manufacturing and robotics along with a high inter- est in the medical device industry. Our 20+ conference speakers range from industry profes- sionals to educators to executives from Intuitive Surgical, Varian Medical Systems, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, Stanford University, various startup companies and more with


in-depth presentations on: t IoT in devices, infrastructure and services; t Robotic trends in surgery and medical equipment, as well as fl exible manufacturing;


t 3D bioprinting of blood vessels, additive metal process and scalable additive systems;


t The future of autonomous systems from driverless cars to space robots; and


t Career development and career fair with mixer. While our annual conference continues to be our chapter’s biggest challenge, we’ve seen a year-over-year growth in attendance (from 50 attendees to 200 attendees in 10 years). Our secret to this growth and event strength is our consistent collaboration with a wide range of groups, including 15 com- panies, 10+ professional societies, 10 colleges, four SME Cali- fornia chapters, local high school educators, three municipal economic groups and other nonprofi ts such as Silicon Valley Robotics, FIRST Robotics and the Bio2Device Group. Overall, we’ve created an annual event that provides an energizing, inspiring and educational array of speakers and sponsors who help our attendees stay informed of what’s right around the corner. It’s also helped us learn, grow and be noticed in the Silicon Valley. To learn more about our an- nual conference, visit smesv.org/conference.


June 2016 | AdvancedManufacturing.org 11


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