This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
QUALITY ASSURANCE SOFTWARE


wear, noted Michael Stones, product marketing manager, Delcam (Birmingham, UK). “Tool wear results in a loss of dimensional accuracy and defective parts. Higher cutting speeds and temperatures challenge accuracy even fur- ther,” Stones said. “Measure- ment data from machine tool probes can help you maintain machine performance. By measuring critical dimensions after each cutting cycle and monitoring variations in the measurement data with statis- tical process control analysis, you can identify trends in variation, ‘process drift.’ With this knowledge, you’re able


ARNO® Medical Solutions


to update your machining coordinates before tool wear causes a nonconforming part. Minimal rework will improve


The InspectionXpert OnDemand for CAD software supports 3D Model-Based Defi nition (MBD) and traditional 2D print-based inspection planning.


Improvingand Solving


Advanced products for medical tooling challenges Medical components are made from high corrosion and wear resistant


titaniums, stainless steels and special alloys. Arno has developed state of the art tooling to cope with these demanding applications in the most productive and cost ef ective way


productive and cost efffective way.


your shop’s performance, and greater process control will facilitate unmanned, lights-out machining. Machine tool probes can be used to ensure constant pro- duction quality, Stones added. “You can monitor tool wear without the usual downtime associated with off-machine measurement. Surface inspection data also allows you to identify and predict maintenance requirements. By measuring before fi nish machining, you can adapt the fi nal process to prolong tool life and maintain an optimal surface fi nish.” One of the biggest payoffs for SPC is preventing a manufacturer from making “bad” or “out-of-tolerance” parts, said Josh Old, application engineering manager, Capture 3D Inc. (Costa Mesa, CA). “Many manufactur- ing processes create tool wear. This occurs when the tool begins to change over time through usage,” he said. In the metalstamping process, for example, the die itself can begin to wear over time from the continuous process of the sheetmetal being pressed into the die to form the desired shape, he added.


Booth # W-2246 Visit us at High Precision Positive Inse High Precision Positive Inserts Arno® Cut-OfCut-Off & Grooving Grooving Mini System Deco-Cut 1-800-943-4426 or www.arnousa.com Learn more about our products: 78 AdvancedManufacturing.org | June 2016


“These changes typically occur over periods of time and not all at once. Through the use of SPC reports, the manufacturer can see the trend of the stamped part start to move away from the desired shape, but catching it before the parts are actually out of tolerance,” Old said. With this information, the manufacturer can address the tooling issue before they ever make bad or out-of-tolerance


Image courtesy InspectionXpert Corp.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130