This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
SHOP SOLUTIONS


one year’s time.” Victory also takes advantage of the bridge mill’s versatility by running a range of jobs with a variety of workpiece sizes, from small to large.


In addition, the 90-tool ATC has greatly reduced setup times and increased effi ciency to meet tight tolerance specifi - cations versus their older machines, which only offer 24 tools at a time. Typically, Victory uses 76 tools every day, so tool standardization is important to minimize tool changes, save time and reduce the amount of programming required. “Setups are much quicker because the


Victory Tool typically machines steel, tool steel, and hardened steel such as D2, A2 and 4140 hot-rolled steel for its metaltamping die customers.


QUICK PINS.


RELEASE BALL-LOCK


tools are already loaded into the machine. We calculated we are saving upwards to $70,000 annually with the 90-tool ATC alone,” said Simonson. “Most shops are trying to accom- plish similar work with 30 or 40 tools.” Meixell added, “We have a dedicated setup crew who is very impressed with the time savings as well as the advantage of the 90-tool ATC to more effi ciently meet high-accuracy requirements.” Many jobs that Victory tackles are compli- cated, such as large, progressive stamping dies which have tight tolerances and multiple, complex features. “Some customers give us die specifi cations which are 40 pages or more, so we have to be in close touch with our customers throughout the jobs in order to meet their part requirements,” said Meixell. “The complexity can be daunting, but having effi cient machining capability in-house with the Feeler has sig- nifi cantly increased our throughput and accuracy. We can col- laboratively work with our customers who are confi dent with our capabilities, and so are receptive to our ideas which sometimes include alternative engineering/ design methods.” The benefi ts of acquiring the Feeler have far exceeded original expectations, according to Simonson and his team, who are impressed with the rigidity and reliability of the bridge mill. “We set up a job before a shift ends and run it lights out— sometimes up to 20 hours untended,” Simonson said. “This allows an operator to multitask and work on other jobs.” Word has been getting around the metalforming indus-


Fairlane Products, Inc. 33792 Doreka Drive Fraser, MI 48026 (586) 294-6100 FAX (586) 294-6822 800-548-2935 fairlaneproducts.com


Fairlane Products quick release fasteners and accessories in inch and metric sizes. The pins have a wide range of uses in fastening, locating and alignment applications and come in a variety of diameters, lengths and materials. Also available are wire rope lanyard assemblies. Call or go online to find a distributor in your area.


try that Victory has a large bridge mill capable of doing a broader range of work. As a result, Victory is now taking on the machining of big plates. Victory Tool estimates a two- to three-year return-on- investment for their Feeler purchase. “We are extremely pleased with our decision to bring in the bridge mill,” said Lynch. “Now we are able to take on new business and have increased sales while reducing cycle time and scrap.” For more information from Methods Machine Tools Inc., go to www.methodsmachine.com, or phone 978-443-5388.


84 AdvancedManufacturing.org | June 2016


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130