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WORKFORCE PIPELINE A MONTHLY FEATURE ABOUT TRAINING, EDUCATION & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT


w Connect Education with Job Opportunities T


oday, two-thirds of manufacturing companies report a moderate to severe shortage of available, qualifi ed work- ers, with as many as 5% of current jobs going unfi lled due to a lack of capable candidates—this represents 600,000 jobs. One technical job area that has been contributing to the


problem and opportunity is Dimensional Metrology, the science of length, size and dimension measurement in 2D and 3D real- world and digital space in order to compare, analyze and verify the real physical part to the Original CAD-Model of the part.


necessary GD&T annotations. This insures the 3D CAD Model contains all the information to defi ne a part or product. Inspec- tion, measurement, analysis, build and reverse engineering are activities that utilize MBD features for parts and subassemblies which are built, then verifi ed using an MBD quality inspection process. MBD is the undisputed source of defi nition. This process eliminates the expense and time consuming


Over the last two decades, Dimensional Metrology techni- cians have been in high demand, with the trend line growing exponentially higher. This is due to the adoption of Model- Based Enterprise (MBE) strategies and processes by tier one aerospace entities, including DOD; NASA; Boeing; Northrop; Lockheed and others.


At the heart of the MBE is the CAD Model; it is the absolute authority to defi ne a part or entire product. The core of part defi nition is Model Based Defi nition (MBD), which is defi ned by having an unambiguously defi ned 3D data set, including all


94 AdvancedManufacturing.org | June 2016


process of mock-ups, as Interoperability, Manufacturability and Interference-fi ts are all sorted out prior to the fi rst actual manufacturing process taking place. “There is unlimited opportunity for re-use of CAD data when product design intent is captured digitally and the digital thread is maintained. Digital data sets must be accurate, consumable by software, and support direct manufacture from 3D geometry,” said Jennifer Herron, CEO of Action Engineering and author of Re-Use Your CAD. “In order to Re-Use Your CAD and take advantage of MBD inspection and measure- ment opportunities, she said, “you must fi rst create 3D models that are compliant with standard modeling practices and meet ASME and ISO requirements.” Whereas manufacturing and quality assurance uses 3D MBD for inspection and validation, MBE serves as the authoritative information source for all activities in the product’s lifecycle. The four technical thrust areas are: Product Lifecycle Management Integration, Model- Based Systems Engineering, Model-Based Manufacturing, and Model-Based Work Instructions. All future large scale manufacturing operations will be MBE which is the future state of manufacturing. The practice of using 3D Models and Technical Data Packages as a single source model throughout the lifecycle of a product is quickly becoming common practice. It provides a reference source to base funding and training decisions on. MBE is an inte- grated and collaborative environment, founded on 3D MBD, shared across the enterprise, enabling rapid, seamless, and


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