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SHOP SOLUTIONS


ship with Licon MT for years, and within just a few days he found an ideal solution for both work processes. For the roughing, an F2334 round-insert milling cutter


from Walter has been used since the end of September 2015 instead of the octagon milling cutter that was previ- ously employed. “This milling cutter’s strengths include very smooth running and a high level of process reliability,” said Huber. “Round indexable inserts with location fl ats and a robust insert clamping system allow for high feeds and metal removal rates—particularly with roughing materials that are diffi cult to cut.”


For the subsequent fi nishing, the F5041 Walter BLAXX shoulder mill from Walter replaced the shoulder mill that was previously used. “The F5041 is designed for high levels of toughness, stability, process reliability and productivity,” said Walter’s Huber. “The basis for these advantages is a Walter BLAXX tool body that is protected against wear by a special surface treatment, a particularly robust core, four helical, positive cutting edges per indexable insert and the precise 90° on the workpiece.” Walter’s milling cutter combines the advantages of tan- gential milling systems with the strengths of indexable inserts that come with the manufacturer’s own Tiger·tec Silver CVD


Circular interpolation with Walter’s F2334 round insert milling cutter reduced roughing machining time from 56 minutes to just 10 minutes to expand the opening from a diameter of 7.87 to 9.49” (200–241 mm).


coating. With this temperature-resistant, particularly wear- resistant coating, aluminum oxide with its optimized micro- structure contributes to reduced machining times. Extremely smooth rake faces are designed to minimize tribochemical


98 AdvancedManufacturing.org | September 2016


wear. A silver fl ank face as an indicator layer means that wear can be easily detected, therefore preventing cutting edges from being wasted. The round-insert milling cutter that is used for the rough- ing has a diameter of 6.30" (160 mm) and is equipped with 10 eight-increment round inserts with Tiger·tec Silver coating. By changing to this tool, the feed rate per tooth has increased from 0.01 to 0.03" (0.25–0.8 mm), and the depth of cut has increased from 0.02 to 0.04" (0.5–1 mm). On the round insert, the effective cutting approach angle is 20° in contrast to 45° on the eight-edged insert on the previ- ous octagon milling cutter. “The lower the approach angle, the thinner the swarf and the higher the potential feed,” said Hu- ber. The feed rate was therefore able to increase from 33.46 to 106.30 ipm (850–2700 mm/min), and the machining time sank from 56 minutes to just 10 minutes. “We did not expect to see this type of improvement,” said Dammann. Saving 46 minutes per workpiece means that, for 100 components each year, there is a capacity increase of 76 hours. Another positive effect of Walter’s solution: The thinner the swarf, the lower the load on the milling spindle, and the more smoothly the machine runs. Reduced vibration means reduced wear on the machine, better surface fi nish and longer edge life. The Walter BLAXX shoulder mill 2.48" (63-mm) diam- eter that has been used for the fi nishing application since the changeover, is equipped with seven square indexable inserts while the competing product was equipped with six square inserts. The seven inserts on Walter’s milling cutter are tangential double-sided inserts with four cut- ting edges and wide fi nishing land. This product is made from Walter’s wear-resistant WAK15 cutting tool material and has a long secondary cutting edge. This means that a higher feed per tooth is possible and ensures that the surface quality is signifi cantly improved. By changing the fi nishing tool to Walter BLAXX, it was possible to increase the feed per tooth from 0.08 to 0.35 mm. The feed rate increased from 11.81 to 137.80 ipm (300–3500 mm/min), and the machining time fell from 48 minutes to just fi ve minutes. “This is roughly one tenth—we would hardly have dared to dream about such fi gures,” said Dammann. Reducing the machining time for each workpiece by 43 minutes means that, for 100 components each year, there is a capacity increase of 72 hours and signifi cant cost savings. For more information about Walter USA LLC, go to www.walter-tools.com/us, or phone 800-945-5554.


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