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THE YEAR 4 PHENOMENON


Twelve years ago, Northwestern stunned Virginia to win its first NCAA championship in just its fourth season since Kelly Amonte Hiller revived the women’s lacrosse program there in 2002. Last year, USC’s women and Marquette’s men enjoyed historic success, each winning conference championships and hosting NCAA tournament games in their fourth year of existence. The year-four phenomenon — a trend in which senior-dominant squads have surged past traditional powers — has continued in 2017. The college lacrosse expansion class of 2014 wrought all sorts of havoc on the national rankings in the first month of the season.


The Colorado women started 6-0 with wins over Northwestern, UMass and Denver to move into the Top 10. Not far behind them was Elon, which took down Virginia and Virginia Tech. “You can find incredible athletes that are top players no matter where you go,” Colorado coach Ann Elliott said. “More and more schools in these conferences will see that as an incredible opportunity to add a program in a sport that is growing quickly and be successful if they do it the right way.” On the men’s side, Boston University, Richmond and Monmouth all flirted with the Top


20.


Here’s a closer look at the upward trajectory, with results through the first month of this season.


BOSTON UNIVERSITY (MEN) YEAR


W-L


2014 2-12 2015 6-8 2016 8-7 2017 6-0


COLORADO (WOMEN) YEAR


W-L


2014 11-8 2015 11-7 2016 13-5 2017 6-0


ELON (WOMEN) YEAR


W-L


2014 8-9 2015 8-8 2016 10-7 2017 5-1


MONMOUTH (MEN) YEAR


W-L


2014 0-13 2015 6-8 2016 7-7 2017 3-2


RICHMOND (MEN) YEAR


W-L


2014 6-11 2015 11-5 2016 11-5 2017 4-1


USlaxmagazine.com PCT


.143 .429 .533


1.000 PCT


.579 .611 .722


1.000 PCT


.470 .500 .588 .833


PCT


.000 .429 .533 .600


PCT


.353 .688 .688 .800


April 2017 US LACROSSE MAGAZINE 31


©JOHN STROHSACKER; ©COLORADO; ©RICHMOND; ©ELON


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