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BEST PRACTICES LIGHTNING


US Lacrosse recommends following an emergency action plan (EAP) to deal with severe weather, including lightning. The EAP should include the following:


1) Individuals responsible for game management and medical issues should be designated. The referee usually makes the call to leave the fi eld in inclement weather, but coaches and others should provide input.


2) A person should be designated to watch the weather. If a thunderstorm is imminent, the practice/game should be suspended or postponed. If lightning is seen or thunder heard, activities should stop and everyone should seek shelter.


3) The designated “weather watcher” should consult television news, Internet, cable and satellite weather programming, lightning monitoring systems, and the National Weather Service (www.weather.gov).


4) In case of lightning, people should be moved to safe locations like buildings with grounded wiring and plumbing and vehicles, including school buses, with a hard metal roof and the windows shut


Some unsafe locations to avoid are the showers or plumbing of a building, small covered outdoor shelters, areas connected to or near light poles, towers and fences, and any location that is at the highest point in the area.


5) To reduce the chance of lightning-related injury: • Thunder may be hard to hear, and lightning may be diffi cult to see. • Cell phones and cordless phones are preferred over landlines.


• If one feels the hair on their head, neck or arms stand on end, or feel skin tingling, then a lightning strike may be imminent.


• Everyone must wait 30 minutes between the last sound of thunder and/or the last fl ash of lightning before resuming activity.


• Initiate emergency treatment immediately if a person is struck!


79 USLacrosse.org/RiskManagement


BEST PRACTICES LIGHTNING


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