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GAME PLAY SUBSTITUTIONS


WHAT IS IT? Teams may substitute for any player on the field.


Substitutions “on the fly” may be made during live play by substituting one player for another with the entering player waiting until the field player exits via the table area. Note: optional horn substitutions are allowed at the U9 and U11 levels to make it easier for


FUNDAMENTALS


THE BOX The table area is also referred to as the substitution box. Players must stay outside this area until substitution is imminent.


DEVELOPMENTAL


A team may not have more than 10 players on the field at any time.


At lower levels many coaches will substitute players in lines from defense to midfield to attack so all players learn to play all positions.


At higher levels of play coaches will make use of long-stick midfielders, short-stick defenders and a faceoff specialist, leading to more situational substitutions.


At younger levels of play, a horn may be used to signal substitutions.


COMMUNICATION Players and coaches must communicate to effectively perform substitutions.


PLAY SAFE


At all times, a player in the box waiting to substitute must make way for players leaving the field.


Players must be substituted if play is stopped due to injury or blood on his uniform, skin or personal equipment.


At younger ages, coaches of opposing teams can work together in substituting to ensure players of similar size are matched.


If a coach has a concern that a player may be injured, they should quickly notify the officials and substitute the player.


MIDFIELDERS Teams will often substitute two or three lines as well as multiple attackmen and defenders throughout the game.


coaches to get younger players on and off the field.


WHEN at most times during game


WHERE From the table area or from the bench during timeouts WHO players from both teams


WHY to give players opportunities to play and rest


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BOYS YOUTH RULES GUIDEBOOK


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