This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
GAME SKILLS STICK SKILLS


WHAT IS IT? Stick skills like passing, catching, shooting and


cradling, are essential in the game of lacrosse. Developing these skills both in and out of practice ensures the best playing experience.


WHEN always, lacrosse can’t be played competitively without stick skills


WHERE anywhere on field WHO all players


WHY stick skills are the fundamental building block of lacrosse


FUNDAMENTALS


CRADLING Mastering the cradling motion when carrying the ball will keep the ball in the stick and make it harder


for defenders to knock it out.


PASSING Hands high at shoulder height and away. Push top hand, pull bottom hand. Follow through pointing at target.


DEVELOPMENTAL


Passing and shooting overhand is critical in player development.


Catching – soft hands, “snatch catching” should be discouraged.


Practice all skills both right-handed and left-handed.


Advanced moves build off of proper cradling and dodging mechanics.


“Wall ball” improves skills and helps a player’s important muscle memory.


CATCHING Opposite motion of passing allowing top hand to pull back softly as ball arrives. Top hand should be high on the stick.


SHOOTING Step towards target, point bottom elbow toward goal, and follow through with head of stick pointed toward goal.


PLAY SAFE


Keep head up at all times when running, passing and catching.


Helmets should be worn when learning to catch and throw.


In practice drills or when out with friends always be aware of others shooting and stay out from behind the goal. Helmets and gloves should always be worn.


Eliminating body checking at younger ages helps players develop good stick skills in a safe environment.


NOTE: FOR STICK SPECIFICATIONS, PLEASE SEE PAGE 15 OF THIS GUIDEBOOK


46 BOYS YOUTH RULES GUIDEBOOK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84