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TIME FACTORS TIME & SCORE


WHAT IS IT? The home team will assign a timekeeper to keep


the regulation playing time and agreed upon half times. A separate scorekeeper should be assigned to


keep and record the score. FUNDAMENTALS


SCORING Leagues can choose to not keep score at any level.


STOP TIME Start and stop clock when official sounds whistle and at the end of each period.


DEVELOPMENTAL


U9 AND BELOW - Four 12-minute running time periods. If stop time used, 8-minute quarters are recommended.


U11 - Four 8-minute stop-time quarters. If running time, 12-minute quarters.


U13 - Four 10-minute stop-time quarters. If tied at end of two 4-minute overtimes, game ends in tie.


U15 - Four 10-minute stop-time quarters. If tied, unlimited 4-minute stop-time sudden victory overtimes.


If league or tournament play requires a winner be determined, overtime should be played in accordance with the U15 rules.


32


RUNNING TIME Clock only stops for timeouts and officials’ timeouts.


OVERTIME U13 & U15 games tied after regulation play result in 4-minute sudden victory overtime periods.


PLAY SAFE


Shorter time periods, stop time, or running time may be used. If running time is to be used, the clock will stop for all timeouts.


The officials may keep time on field.


In cases of high heat and/or humidity, mandatory water breaks should be added during the game.


Scorer’s table must be at least 6 yards away from the sideline to allow room for players to safely substitute.


The penalty box area must be kept clear of players and coaches for safety, organization and to provide the timer and scorer an unobstructed view of the field.


BOYS YOUTH RULES GUIDEBOOK WHEN all games


WHERE scorer’s/timer’s table between the benches at center line


WHO most leagues have parents volunteer to serve in these roles WHY maintain accurate time and score


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