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ROLES ADMINISTRATION


WHAT IS IT? The designated home team must assign a person to ensure


the venue is prepared for competition and manned with officials, official timers and score keepers, and sideline


managers, as needed. FUNDAMENTALS


COMMUNICATION Before the game, administrator, coaches and officials should discuss shared expectations.


SAFETY Administrators, coaches and officials need to be aware of potential unsafe conditions, such as poor weather or poor field conditions, and


take appropriate action. DEVELOPMENTAL


U9 AND BELOW - Play may be reduced to 7v7 with a smaller playing field


U11 - Same as U9 and below


At all levels the use of a sideline manager is highly recommended.


Administrator and/or coaches should ensure that the game officials are aware of the players’ ages and appropriate rules for that level of play.


PLAY SAFE


Administrators should promote good sportsmanship for players, fans and coaches.


In case of lightning, play should stop for 30 minutes after the last clap of thunder or flash of lightning as determined by game officials.


If a player is injured or bleeding he should be treated immediately and a substitute must replace him.


The field must be clearly marked and of the proper dimensions.


Medical kit and water supplies should be available. It is also strongly recommend- ed that an AED be in close proximity.


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BOYS YOUTH RULES GUIDEBOOK USLacrosse.org/Administrators


SCORER’S TABLE Each game should have a scorer and a timekeeper at a table with lacrosse balls, a horn, a


score book and a clock.


ORGANIZATION Administrators are responsible for the details necessary to ensure the game goes smoothly.


WHEN before and during a game WHERE the home team’s field


WHO assigned administrator or if none, home team’s coach


WHY to ensure game can proceed safely within the rules


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