This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
NOVEL SOLUTIONS


Leading Where? I


BRIAN SANDALOW, ASSOCIATE EDITOR


n the book “You Don’t Need a Title to be a Leader,” author Mark Sanborn tries to lay out how anybody in any company can be a leader,


regardless of shiny title, fancy business card or even a large salary. He does this by not following a single nar- rative, but brief vignette after brief vignette after brief vignette after... Well, you get the point. This isn’t really a knock against Sanborn, but his


writing style in this very brief book of 102 pages didn’t help me to see what he was trying to get across. As I read this book, I kept waiting for re- peated extended narratives (even one that would be a few pages), where I could see how somebody took some of the lessons in this book and improved their career and also the life of the business where they work. At least for me, that would give me time to see some parallels in my life and career, and perhaps see how they could be applied to make things even better for myself and my employers. T ere are a couple very strong examples of this, and


I won’t ruin them, but a few more would have been helpful for the reader. T at said, there are reasons to pick up this book. T ough it didn’t do much for me, Sanborn’s writing


style could be helpful if you’re not looking for one story but numerous small snippets and examples of lessons. He breaks down his theory into “six principles of leadership” and then pings rapid-fi re stories at the reader one after another. Some valuable lessons can be learned in the pages of this book. Perhaps the most important is a very early passage in the book. It reads “It doesn’t matter what your position is, or how long you’ve worked at your job, whether you help to run your family, a PTA committee, or a Fortune 500 company. Anyone at any level can learn to be a leader and help to shape or infl u- ence the world around them.” T at’s pretty good, and something every employee


of every company should take to heart. T e six prin- ciples also provide value and the snippets do bring strong advice and tips. One that is especially strong is the chapter on the power of persuasive communica- tion. During the nine-page section, Sanborn high- lights how to communicate eff ectively, and stresses the importance of word selection. In the end, there is a value to reading this book.


Leadership is a tricky thing to defi ne. It’s not tangible, and probably falls into the “you know it when you see it” category, and Sanborn does go a long way in illumi- nating some very helpful and important tactics. T ey are tactics that may seem obvious but aren’t, and they are tactics that are surprisingly easy to implement.


It doesn’t matter what your


position is, or how long you’ve worked at your job, whether


you help to run your family, a PTA committee, or a Fortune 500 company. Anyone at any level can learn to be a leader and help to shape or infl uence the world around them.


Metalcasters’ Translation: When you think of leaders at metalcasting facilities you might think of fl oor managers or the people in the executive of- fi ces overseeing the operation. T at doesn’t have to be true. Every single person who contributes to the casting process can be a leader. As long as your work has purpose and you try to help your co-workers and company as a whole, you can be a leader.


November 2016 MODERN CASTING | 63 ABRIDGED


Relevance to Metalcasters Technical Diffi culty Self-Help Fluff Profi t Booster


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180