This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
casting design. Te class is intentionally kept low on promotion, taught from an industry perspective and offered free of charge to OFC customers. Te industry standards as published by the Investment Casting Institute make the foundation of the class and are augmented by the lessons learned from years of working to resolve common casting design anomalies. Te IC-101 class content continues to evolve based on feedback received from OFC’s customer students. In the beginning, OFC was uncer- tain as to the potential demand for its IC-101 class. It began by proposing the class to selected customers and was somewhat disappointed by what appeared to be tepid interest. Not dissuaded, OFC more aggressively marketed the class and advertised the new offering by an email blast. OFC found it difficult to directly


connect with the engineers who would benefit most from the training because they were often insulated from their supply chain. Te challenge then became how to best make engineers aware of this opportunity for training. Often times that introduction was facilitated by our customer’s quality engineering or commodity manage- ment. Interest in the class grew and demand has grown to the point that it is now teaching IC-101 on a monthly basis, often conducting two or three sessions per visit. It became clear that IC-101 was


addressing a substantial customer need for information. Following a class of 40 engineers, one manager first con- gratulated and then challenged OFC with a question: “What more can you do to help us be better?” In 2014, OFC began to offer its


customers a free IC-201 class. IC-201 is a three-day class held at OFC that teaches the basics of investment casting manufacturing. Both investment cast- ing classes stress the benefits of early collaborative involvement. Engineers can be more receptive to design sug- gestions when discussed at the “napkin” stages and before the ink dries. How- ever, a frequently heard comment from IC-101 students is that engineers are under pressure to deliver and generally aren’t afforded the necessary time to


November 2015 MODERN CASTING | 39


linger over a design. After repeatedly hearing that statement, OFC realized if it truly wanted to participate in concur- rent engineering activity, it needed to provide customer engineers with timely access to its resources. OFC chose to refocus its business


development activities as collaborative engineering interaction rather than


strictly a sales effort. Te company hired engineers to act as its internal points of contact so they could not only respond quickly to technical questions but also be proactive. As an example, on receipt of a request for quotation, engi- neers reach out to customers with an offer of assistance to make the design more robust. Given the communication


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180