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EDITORIAL


Reaching an Equilibrium W


hat does the future hold for our industry? At a recent conference for the metal- lurgical coke supply chain, this question


was posed when discussing the U.S. steel market. Due to a down economy and global supply pressures, this market is facing significant business turmoil and at a crossroads to determine what and where its future will be. During my


presentation to this conference’s attendees about the state of the metalcasting in- dustry, I referenced the crossroads our industry faced in 2008-2010 when the future of U.S. metalcasting was uncertain. My message to the attendees was to look where the metalcasting industry is today, only a handful of years after its crossroads, as it may be the envy of all other metalcasting markets across the globe. Sure, U.S. production in several non-auto-


My message to the


attendees was to look where the metalcasting industry is today, only a handful of years after its crossroads, as it may be the envy of all other metalcasting markets across the globe.


motive markets is down significantly right now. Some segments of our production are operating at 50-60% of capacity while others are operating at 85-90%. But an equilibrium is beginning to be achieved in our supply chain. Not everything is moving offshore (as it seemed 10 years ago) nor is everything being sourced domestically—a bal- ance is being sought in hopes of securing business success across the supply chain. Look at some of the recent headlines:


• Sakthi Breaks Ground on a $31.8 Million Cast- ing Expansion in Michigan


• Georg Fischer and Linamar Agree to Build a Metalcasting Facility in the Southeast U.S.


• Kamtek to Invest $80 million in a New Diecasting Facility in Alabama


• Warren Buffet’s Berkshire Hathaway Purchases Precision Castparts for $37 Billion These headlines show investment and con- tinued global interest in the U.S metalcasting


Alfred T. Spada, Publisher/Editor-in-Chief


If you have any comments about this editorial or any other item that appears in Modern Casting, email me at aspada@afsinc.org.


November 2015 MODERN CASTING | 9


supply chain. Our feature, “Anderson Industries Takes New Track With Iron Castings,” on p. 30, details a casting buyer’s move to diversify its capabilities and customer base by acquiring a U.S. metalcaster. “What initially interested me in buy- ing Dakota Foundry was how it could broaden our services to customers on both sides,” said Kory Ander- son, president of Anderson Industries. “We could, as one company, offer so many solu- tions, whether it’s iron or steel.”


Tis re-


newed interest is a great turnaround for our industry. Yes, irrational sourcing deci-


sions still are being made by casting buyers every day. These will always continue no matter the level of information and education you provide your customers. Just con-


tinue to focus your marketing and sales efforts to insulate your business as best as possible by diversifying your customer base and the end-use markets you serve. Te future for metalcasting is full of possibili-


ties. Te key is the ability of metalcasters to take advantage of them.


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