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Metalcasting Congress Gathers Industry to Milwaukee


The annual show brings together suppliers, metalcasters and casting buyers for knowledge transfer, professional development and business meetings.


Milwaukee April 25-27. Metalcast- ing Congress offers professional development, technology transfer and networking opportunities to all members of the metalcasting supply chain community, including suppli- ers, metalcasters and casting buyers/ designers. More than 200 exhibitors will be


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on hand to discuss their solutions to metalcasting operations, design and engineering. A free reception with the exhibitors will be held Wednesday, April 26 from 4:30-6 p.m. Attendees are invited to mingle on the show floor with exhibitors and enjoy refreshments and light hors d’oeuvres. Two registration options are avail-


able for Metalcasting Congress: for exhibits only or exhibits and education. Tose registered with Exhibits and


Education passes will have access to 2 1/2 days of technical and manage- ment sessions covering the business of metalcasting, engineering & technol- ogy, casting design & purchasing, nonferrous and ferrous alloys, molding processes, environmental health & safety, and professional development. The AFS Institute returns this


year with four short-format courses on Casting Material Properties, Identifying the Correct Casting Defect, Virtual Casting Process, and Building Positive Buzz: Intentionally Shaping Your Reputation Through Emotional Intelligence. Harry Moser, founder of the Re- shoring Initiative, headlines the first


54 | MODERN CASTING March 2017 A MODERN CASTING STAFF REPORT


he North American metalcasting industry’s annual show heads to


Metalcasting Congress is held at the Wisconsin City Center in Milwaukee this year.


day of the show as keynote speaker. He will address how companies can assess more accurately the total cost of offshoring and talk about how manufacturing can shift the collective thinking from “offshoring is cheaper” to “local production reduces the total cost of ownership.” Moser also will be leading a work- shop later that day on quantifying domestic sourcing’s financial benefits for companies and their customers. “We helped a Chicago area contract


manufacturer save a $60 million order versus a lower-price Chinese competi- tor,” Moser said. Te goal of the workshop is to


train metalcasters to achieve similar results. Te workshop is included with Congress registration, but advance registration is requested to ensure a seat and workshop materials. Notify Diane Waligurski at dwaligurski@afsinc.org of your plans to attend.


Hoyt Memorial Lecturer Doug Tri-


nowski will close out the Metalcasting Congress program on Tursday, April 27. Trinowski’s lecture, “Te Power and Need for Research in Metalcast- ing,” will compare and contrast how research is conducted in other coun- tries, primarily those in the European Union. He also will discuss the need for improving the technical transfer process and commercializing funda- mental research to improve competi- tiveness and sustainability of the North American metalcasting community. At the Annual Banquet, held Tues-


day, April 25, the industry’s top honor, the AFS Gold Medal, will be awarded to Gary Gigante, retired CEO, Wau- paca Foundry Inc. (Waupaca, Wiscon- sin) and Sara Joyce, vice president of quality and technical assurance, Badger Mining Corp. (Berlin, Wisconsin). Other networking events include the Copper Division Luncheon, Division


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