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Solving Weldment to Casting for Performance, Strength, Appearance


U I


n 2013, agricultural tillage equip- ment manufacturer Wil-Rich, Wahpeton, N.D., approached


Monarch Industries Ltd., Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, to explore con- verting a weldment to a ductile iron casting. Te component on the SoilPro 513 double disc ripper provides the main mounting structure for the shank assembly to be attached to the frame of the tillage unit. It also contains three of the major pivot points for the trip assembly. Originally constructed with eight steel pieces (torch cut and bent or saw


40 | MODERN CASTING August 2015


cut, then welded and machined), the component was difficult to manu- facture consistently and alignment remained a challenge. During weld- ing, the supplier needed to rely on the fixture to hold the pin holes in alignment, and Wil-Rich also had issues with the weld holding the bushings in place. Te casting conversion featured a single core in green sand. With an annual production volume of 2,000 pieces, the D64-45-12 ductile iron casting measures 22 x 12 x 10 in. (55.88 x 30.48 x 25.4 cm) and weighs


55 lbs. (25 kg). Te customer realized a number of advantages, including: • The machined casting provided a 25% reduction in cost over the original weldment.


• By converting the component from a weldment, Wil-Rich freed up plant capacity in the welding and fabrication departments.


• The machined casting, compared to the welded fabrication, resulted in much improved alignment in the holes with tighter hole-to-hole tolerances.


• The cast component eliminated


nfortunately in manu- facturing, not every part is a straightforward design with a straight-


forward method of production. When design engineers need a component to reduce cost, provide critical properties or be delivered in an abbreviated time frame, they often reach out to their


Customers’ Problems


Several examples show how metalcasters collaborate with customers on design and process improvements. A MODERN CASTING STAFF REPORT


metalcasting supplier for help in com- ing up with an answer. Te solution can be a conversion


to casting from another manufactur- ing process, a tweak to an initial casting design, or the use of alternative tooling methods. Whatever the case, the success- ful metalcaster will match the customer’s concerns with feasible solutions.


Following are instances where


casting facilities stepped in to help a customer address and solve a problem through engineering, process control or new technologies to update decades-old patterns. Te metals, applications and casting processes may differ, but what remains the same is the open customer- supplier partnership.


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