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FIONA HINGSTON LIZ GREGORY


Almost six years ago, Liz started drawing on a discarded piece of black silage wrap which she found in a hedge. Unforeseen and unplanned, this drawing has developed into a major piece of work, measuring over seven metres in length. The bursary supports Liz to bring the project together, including developing the idea, completing the work and presenting it at the Festival.


Liz Gregory is a painter and printmaker based in the Blackdown Hills on the Devon/Somerset border. She has a fine art degree from Birmingham College of Art. lizgregory.co.uk


Venue 37: Cotley Tithe Barn, COTLEY, Chard, TA20 3EP


For twenty years Fiona has recorded aspects of the landscape through drawing, photography, found objects and book works. Over the past couple of years her observations have become disrupted by the growing awareness of quiet erosion; silent barns, decaying farm buildings, monoculture crops and vanishing flora and fauna. She sees this local loss as directly connecting to wider issues of commercial standardisation and a diminishing of both environmental and cultural diversity.


The bursary supports Fiona to explore ways to make work that addresses wider concerns through mentoring, research and dialogues. In her solo exhibition ‘The English Woman’s Flora’, she presents a new body of work which includes more than 200 wildflowers made from masking tape and graphite. The exhibition is based on the classic pocket book, The Observer Book of Wild Flowers.


Venue 78: Black Swan Arts, 2 Bridge Street, FROME, BA11 1BB


JANE MOWAT JENNY MELLINGS


Jenny is interested in natural phenomena, the unexplained and the fantastical encounters that occur while she travels across rural Somerset by various means, including walking, cycling and public transport. Her new work at Cotley Tithe Barn includes painting, moving image and installation, capturing significant visions and real- life encounters by herself and others that are close to the mystical. Some of these may be as extraordinary as those of ancient myths and legends, but with significance in relation to our contemporary world.


Jenny has worked in South West England for the last 20 years as a lecturer in fine art, including at the University of Plymouth. She also leads gallery and museum workshops, and has led participatory projects for Spacex Gallery, Exeter. jennymellings.com


Venue 37: Cotley Tithe Barn, COTLEY, Chard, TA20 3EP


somersetartworks.org.uk


Jane Mowat works primarily with wood. Her woodcuts use the natural form and surface to inspire her images. She also carves reliefs and more recently, three dimensional sculptures, always using the wood to guide how she cuts and shapes her forms. Her background in Art History has in many ways made her conscious of culture and the way the artist’s imagination can be caught up with history or contemporary narrative. In the last few years she has become increasingly involved in cross-disciplinary practice, and as a result, has brought installation, textile and digital media into her work.


The bursary supports Jane to explore her practice in a range of artforms including drawing, sculpture, wood carving and digital media using inspiration from the mountains of Switzerland to the rivers of Somerset. janemowat.co.uk


Venue 19: Little Hurstone, WATERROW, near Wiveliscombe, TA4 2AT


SOMERSET ART WEEKS #culturematters 47


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